LTBA Scholarship Recipient, Nola Parker Named Miss LSUA

Nola Parker, who was a 2013 LTBA Scholarship winner was crowned 2017 Miss LSUA, April 22. Parker is a senior from Dry Prong and is majoring in Communication Studies.

nola parker

Nola is a racing fan and frequent racetrack visitor who follows friends’ horses at Louisiana Downs, Evangeline Downs and Delta Downs. She expressed her gratitude to the LTBA saying of the scholarship, “It is a true blessing to get a scholarship which has helped make it possible to pursue my education.” Nola won one of two $1,000 scholarships awarded by drawing at the 2013 Louisiana Cup Races. The LTBA awards ten scholarships a year; two at Louisiana Premier Night at Delta Downs in February; two at Louisiana Legends Night at Evangeline Downs in July; two at Louisiana Cup Day at Louisiana Downs in August; and four at Louisiana Champions Day at Fair Grounds in December.

 

An outstanding young lady, Parker who is visually impaired will be attending the 2017 University Scholars Leadership Symposium in Thailand, a Humanitarian Affairs conference. In January 2018, she will be representing the Louisiana Federation of the Blind in Washington DC to advocate for legislation to benefit the visually impaired and blind community.

 

“LTBA is proud to be able to contribute to the future of our state by investing in the education process. We are proud of Nola and all of her accompishments.”

 

 

REGISTRATION OPENS TODAY FOR THE NATIONAL HORSEPLAYERS CHALLENGE AT HARRAH’S LOUISANA DOWNS

May 30, 2017

REGISTRATION OPENS TODAY FOR THE NATIONAL HORSEPLAYERS CHALLENGE AT HARRAH’S LOUISANA DOWNS ON SATURDAY, JUNE 17

 

Owner and Trainer Charles Hukill Still Going Strong

 

Bossier City, LA – Harrah’s Louisiana Downs is pleased to announce that they will host a regional qualifying event for the $2.5 million-est. National Horseplayers Championship. The contest will be held at the Bossier City racetrack on Saturday, June 17 and registration opens today.

This will be a live format, with win, place and show wagers on ten selected races. The entry fee is $300 ($150 entry fee, $150 live bankroll) and the contest will be limited to 100 entries, maximum two entries per person.  All participants must be NHC Tour Members and may join online. The fee of $50 offers valuable discounts for handicapping products and entry into the four FREE remaining online tournaments in 2017.

The top two finishers will win a berth in the world’s richest and most prestigious handicapping tournament which will take place in Las Vegas, February 8-11, 2018. In addition, both winners will receive a $400 travel voucher and hotel accommodations for four nights in Las Vegas.

Registration is now open. Players needing further information may contact Tracey Blevins (tblevins@caesars.com) or Michele Ravencraft (mravencraft@ntra.com).  

Owner and Trainer Charles Hukill a Force at Louisiana Downs

There are many Thoroughbred trainers who pursue the profession because their families were horsemen, and their love for racing was passed down from previous generations.  But Charles Hukill took a very different route!

Hukill was born in Dallas, Texas and built a very successful landscaping and sprinkler business in Plano, 20 miles northeast of downtown Dallas.  He got into horseracing as an owner in the ‘70’s, but did not begin training until his oldest son assumed control of the family business. In 1998, Hukill took out his trainer’s license and embarked upon building a new business centered on racing and breeding. He owned and operated a training center in Canton, Texas and had as many as 120 horses in the late 1990’s. He was a solid supporter of Texas racing with stakes wins at both Sam Houston Race Park and Lone Star Park.  In addition to training, Hukill stood several stallions, including Sand Tunnel and Record Catch.

Tragedy struck Hukill’s training center in February, 2011 when an electrical fire broke out and 25 horses perished.

 

“That was pretty tough,” acknowledged Hukill.

 

He got out of the breeding after the fire, and owns and trains the majority of his 26 horses currently stabled at Louisiana Downs.

 

“I have one owner, Bobby Salome, who has six horses with me,” said Hukill. “I prefer to train my own and bring them along my way.”

Hukill and his wife, Lynn, have three sons. Growing up, each one worked

​in the family

landscaping and sprinkler business, with the two oldest remaining in that vocation. His youngest son served our country in the Air Force, and Hukill chuckles when he talks about his career choice.

“Dad, I have dug my last hole; I’m going to join the Air Force,” Hukill recalled.

Hukill has started over 6,300 Thoroughbreds in Texas and Louisiana, with a record of 478 wins and purses of $7.5 million. He was the ninth-leading trainer at Louisiana Downs in 2016.

One of his top level horses is Chases Dixie Belle, who captured the Louisiana Cup Juvenile Fillies last August at Louisiana Downs. The daughter of My Pal Charlie has won 2 of her 11 starts and has bankrolled $89,800 to date.

 

“She’s a nice filly,” said Hukill. “She broke her maiden at first asking and moved right into stakes company.”

Hukill will turn 80 in November and talks about slowing down. But his version of cutting back may differ from most people in their late 70’s.  His last venture involved transforming a 40-acre property in Canton into Mare Haven Estates.

“I sold all but two lots,” he said. “It was home to my mares and babies, so that’s why it was named Mare Haven Estates.”

Current Meet Leaders

Last year’s top trainer Joey Foster continues his dominance with 13 wins, through May 30, to lead all conditioners. Foster has started 53 runners and is hitting the board at an impressive 58%. Ronnie Ward, Beverly Burress and Denise Schmidt are tied for second with four wins.

 

Gerardo Mora has the lead in the jockey standings with 15 wins, followed by Richard Eramia who has won 13 races and apprentice Jose Guerrero, who follows closely with 12 wins.

 

Beverly Burress has won four races to top the owner standings. Patti Turner and Red Rose Racing are tied for second with three wins and 13 owners, including Hukill, locked in a showdown for third-place with two victories each.

 

Post Times and Stakes Schedule

Live racing will be conducted Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday and Saturday with a 3:15 p.m. (Central) post time through September 27. For more information on the upcoming racing season and special events, visit https://www.caesars.com/harrahs-louisiana-downs/racing.

The 84-day meet will include 14 stakes highlighted by two major events, Louisiana Cup Day on Saturday, August 5 and Super Derby Day on Saturday, September 9.  To see a complete list of the 2017 Thoroughbred stakes schedule, click here.

About Harrah’s Louisiana Downs

Located near Shreveport in Bossier City, Louisiana, Louisiana Downs opened in 1974 and was purchased by Caesars Entertainment in December, 2002. With annual Thoroughbred and Quarter Horse racing seasons, the track is committed to presenting the highest quality racing programs paired with its 150,000 square foot entertainment complex offering casino gambling, dining and plasma screen televisions for sports and simulcast racing.

For further information, please contact:

Trent McIntosh  |  Assistant General Manager
318-752-6980
8000 East Texas Street | Bossier City, LA 71111
www.caesars.com

Darlene Wahman Obituary

November 23, 1934 – May 27, 2017

Freddie Darlene Wahman, 82, of Alma passed away Saturday, May 27, 2017. She was born on November 23, 1934 in Los Angeles, CA to the late Raymond and Velta McKinney. She graduated from Mulberry High School. She was employed as a secretary at Fort Chaffee Hospital where she met her husband of 52 years, Dr. Gerald Wahman. Her interests were real estate investments, thoroughbred horses, the Razorbacks, the Airedales, and cooking. She enjoyed following all activities of her children and grandchildren. She was a member of First Baptist Church of Alma, and was preceded in death by her brother, Michael McKinney.

She is survived by her husband, Dr. Gerald Wahman of the home; five children, Cindy Henderson of Friendswood, TX, Jeff Wahman and wife Leveta of Van Buren, Lisa Jensen and husband Greg of Alma, Paul Wahman and wife Stacy of Mulberry, and Roger Wahman and wife Amy of Cedar Park, TX; twelve grandchildren, Amy Vazquez and husband Ray, Shane McWater and wife Kristy, and Darci Chambers and husband Kyle, all of Friendswood, TX, Payton Wahman of Van Buren, Gunner Jensen and wife Britney of Oklahoma City, Gage, Garrison, and Gabriel Jensen, all of Alma, Katie, Nicholas, and Alayna Wahman, all of Cedar Park, TX, and eight great-grandchildren, Elena, Ray, and Ava Vazquez, Madelyn and Andrew McWater, and Jesse, Eli, and Katie Chambers, all of Friendswood, TX.

Funeral service will be 10:00 a.m. Thursday, June 1, 2017 at First Baptist Church of Alma with interment to follow at Evergreen Cemetery, under the direction of Edwards Van-Alma Funeral Home of Van Buren.

Pallbearers will be Payton Wahman, Gunner Jensen, Gage Jensen, Garrison Jensen, Gabriel Jensen, Jackson Wahman, Nicholas Wahman, and Shane McWater.

The family will visit with friends from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Wednesday, May 31, 2017 at Edwards Van-Alma Funeral Home, 4100 Alma Highway, Van Buren, AR.

THE $1,000,000 DELTA DOWNS JACKPOT TO TAKE PLACE ON SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 18

IMPORTANT KENTUCKY DERBY POINTS UP FOR GRABS IN THE GRADE III EVENT FOR 2-YEAR-OLDS

 

VINTON, LA. – Boyd Gaming Corporation (NYSE: BYD) today announced that this year’s $1,000,000 Delta Downs Jackpot (Gr. III) for 2-year-olds will be held at its Delta Downs Racetrack Casino & Hotel on Saturdayafternoon, November 18.

 This year will mark the 15th anniversary of the $1,000,000 Delta Downs Jackpot, which is contested at 1-1/16 miles on a dirt surface. The race is the second richest in the country for 2-year-olds and has become a springboard to the Kentucky Derby. Since its inception the race has produced a total of 16 starters, including 10 over the last five years, for America’s most historic race at Churchill Downs.

Last year’s $1,000,000 Delta Downs Jackpot, won by multiple graded stakes winner Gunnevera, was part of a 35-race series that made up the fifth edition of the ‘Road to the Kentucky Derby’ point system. Following his victory at Delta Downs, Gunnevera gained additional qualifying points toward this year’s Kentucky Derby with top three finishes in the Holy Bull Stakes (Gr. II) and Florida Derby (Gr. II) as well as a rousing win in the Fountain of Youth Stakes (Gr. II), each contested at Gulfstream Park.

The 2016 Delta Downs Jackpot Day program featured eight stakes races and over $2.2 million in total purse money. The undercard was highlighted by the $400,000 Delta Downs Princess (Gr. III) for 2-year-old fillies, which produces qualifying points to horses on their way to the Kentucky Oaks (Gr. I). In 2014, Hall of Fame trainer D. Wayne Lukas won the Princess with eventual Eclipse Award winning filly Take Charge Brandi after Tepin won the race in 2013. Tepin would eventually amass over $4.4 million career earnings before being retired just a few weeks ago.

“The Jackpot Day program continues its rich tradition of attracting top quality race horses each year,” said Steve Kuypers, Vice President and General Manager of Delta Downs Racetrack Casino & Hotel. “Not only do the best horses come to Vinton for the event, but many of racing’s top jockeys, trainers and owners take part in a program as well. Our team will be ready to put on another spectacular show on November 18.”

For the fifth consecutive year, Delta Downs will offer a guaranteed $200,000 Jackpot Day Pick 4 during its biggest day of racing. The wager will include four stakes races anchored by the $1,000,000 Delta Downs Jackpot and the $400,000 Delta Downs Princess. Overall there will be eight stakes races during the special 11-race afternoon program.

Horsemen, fans and media can follow developments for this year’s $1,000,000 Delta Downs Jackpot on the website www.deltadownsjackpot.com. Information about Delta Downs’ 2017-18 Thoroughbred season can be found at the track’s website www.deltadownsracing.com.

 

Delta Downs Racetrack Casino and Hotel, a property of Boyd Gaming Corporation (NYSE:BYD), features exciting fun, casino action, live horse racing and great dining experiences. Delta Downs is located in Vinton, Louisiana, on Delta Downs Drive. From Lake Charles, take Exit 7 and from Texas, take Exit 4.

 

June Calendar of Events

 Louisiana Thoroughbred Breeders Association would like to share the following list of dates of interest to Louisiana horsemen and women.

Brought to you by Louisiana Thoroughbred Breeders Association, Whispering Oaks Farm, and Equine Sales CompanyClick images to link to more information

June 1

  • Louisiana Futurity Nomination forms will be mailed
  • LTBA Board of Directors Ballots will be mailed

June 2

  • Tellike Stakes, Evangeline Downs
  • Spotted Horse Stakes, Evangeline Downs
  • Acadiana Stakes, Evangeline Downs

June 3

  • Evangeline Mile, Evangeline Downs
  • Need For Speed, Evangeline Downs
  • Lafayette Stakes, Evangeline Downs

June 10 

  • LTBA Annual Meeting 2:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. at Evangeline Downs. Mojo’s, Evangeline Downs  Racetrack and Casino, 2235 Creswell Lane Extension, Opelousas, LA 70570
  • Belmont Day

June 14

June 13-15

  • OBS June Two-Years-Olds & Horses of Racing Age Sale, Ocala, FL

June 14

  • Flag Day

June 17

  • National Horseplayers Championship regional qualifying event, Harrah’s Louisiana Downs

June 18

  • Fathers Day

June 30 

  • Louisiana Futurity payments due
  • Board of Directors Election ballots counted

July 8

  • Louisiana Legends Night at Evangeline Downs. Seven stakes races for Accredited Louisiana Bred Thoroughbreds worth total purses of $725,000

Would you like to sponsor a newsletter? Reach more than 3,000 readers.

Please contact Linda 985-386-0360, linda@louisianabred.com or Roger 504-947-4676, roger@louisianabred.com for cost and availability.

Do you have a date pertaining to Louisiana-breds that you would like included in an upcoming calendar? Please contact Linda 985-386-0360, linda@louisianabred.com or Roger 504-947-4676, roger@louisianabred.comfor consideration.

 

Any questions or need more info call

Roger A. Heitzmann III, Secretary/Treasurer

Louisiana Thoroughbred Breeders Association

504-947-4676, 800-772-1195

FRESHMAN FLASHPOINT GETS HIS FIRST WINNER

By Eric Mitchell

Louisiana freshman sire Flashpoint’s rst runner eventually become his first winner when Flashy Coop took a five-furlong maiden claiming race May 19 at Hipodromo de las Americas in Mexico City.

The colt out of Cajun Camp, by Forest Camp, was making his fourth start for the ownership entity Cuadra X and trainer Vicente Flores Lomeli. He placed third in his first two starts and came into the May 19 race off an unplaced effort four weeks ago. In breaking his maiden, Flashy Coop stopped the timer in 1:00 2/5.

Bred by Gerard Melancon in Louisiana, Flashy Coop sold through 5 B Farm’s consignment at the 2016 Equine Sales of Louisiana yearling sale for $1,500 to Enrique Cantarell. Cajun Camp has now produced three winners out of five foals to race.

Flashpoint is a 9-year-old son of Pomeroy—Two Punch Lil, by Two Punch, who raced for John Fort’s Peachtree Stable. He won the 2011 Hutcheson Stakes (G2) at Gulfstream Park and the Jersey Shore Stakes (G3) at Monmouth Park. He also won or placed in four other black-type stakes. He retired with a 5-1-2 record out of 15 starts and earned $361,722.

The stallion retired to stud at Brett Brinkman’s La Mesa Stallions near Carencro, La., where he stands for $1,500. Flashpoint has 32 foals in his first crop.

Pasture, for the Insulin Resistant Horse?

By Juliet M. Getty, Ph.D.

 

When is pasture safer for the insulin resistant (IR) horse – late afternoon or early morning? Google this question, ask your vet, or talk to a friend and you will get both answers!  How frustrating! It’s time we cleared this up.

Grass is a living organism and requires NSC (non-structural carbohydrates) for energy in order to grow. NSC is a measure of sugars, starch, and fructans and is produced through the process of photosynthesis when the plant is exposed to sunlight.

In general, the following are true: 

  • Grasses accumulate NSC as the day progresses, making them highly concentrated in NSC by the late afternoon.
  • Once the sun sets, grasses will metabolize NSC for energy, making them lowest in concentration in the early morning hours.

This pattern can be disrupted if the night temperatures remain below 40 degrees F (4 degrees C). When exposed to cold, grasses will hold on to NSC and not relinquish it during the night, making morning grazing less safe for the IR horse.

Other factors that increase NSC:

  • Stressors, such as overgrazing, drought, and too much rain
  • Mowing too short – limit mowing height to no less than 5 inches
  • Letting grasses go to seed
  • Fertilization stimulates growth

 

Warm season vs cool season grasses

Warm and cool season grasses behave differently during prolonged intense heat and sunlight[i]. Warm-season grasses (e.g., Coastal Bermuda and Teff) will naturally thrive during very hot, sunny days and accumulate substantial amounts of NSC by day’s end. However, cool-season grasses (e.g., timothy, brome, orchard, crested wheat grass, rye, fescue, as well as alfalfa) will actually be lower in NSC during periods of prolonged heat and sunlight, as long as the grass is adequately watered. This apparent contradiction occurs because heat and light stimulate the cool season plant’s enzymes that burn off NSC.

 

What about cloudy days? 

Here again, there is a difference between warm and cool season grasses. Photosynthesis still takes place during cloudy days. However, clouds usually cool down the temperature. This can potentially decrease NSC in warm weather grasses, but cool season grasses respond to cooler, more moderate temperatures with a higher NSC content.

 

It is a bit of an art form

You have to know your grasses. You can’t be passive about it. The best way to think about the NSC content in your pasture is to first know the type grass you have, which will give you an idea of what climates it prefers. Then, examine the amount of stress the grass is enduring. Stress will cause all grasses to be higher in NSC.

 

The best approach is to test your pasture

 It’s true that testing only provides a snapshot since grasses are living organisms and change from day to day. But you can get a good idea of how your grass is performing by testing early and late in the season.[ii]When testing your pasture:

  • Note the weather conditions on the day before you test
  • Choose a sunny day to take your samples
  • Take an early morning sample and a late afternoon sample and note the weather conditions

 

Interpreting the test results

 There are three measurements to consider:

1)      ESC (ethanol soluble carbohydrates): simple sugars

2)      WSC (water soluble carbohydrates): simple sugars plus fructans (long chains of fructose molecules)

3)      Starch: long chains of glucose molecules

Add ESC + Starch. You want this sum to be less than 11% (on a dry matter basis) to be considered safe for the IR horse. This is because ESC and starch digestion will raise blood glucose and cause a rise in insulin secretion from the pancreas. Elevated blood insulin is the basis for many laminitis cases.

NSC = WSC + Starch. If this number exceeds 13% (on a dry matter basis) and the ESC + Starch sum is below 11%, it tells you that the fructan level is elevated. Fructans do not significantly raise blood insulin and are generally not a concern. However, excessive fructan intake can possibly lead to cecal acidosis and endotoxin-related laminitis as a result of bacterial fermentation in the hindgut.[iii] There is a need for further, in-depth study since a dangerous level has not been established and studies using fructans have inconsistent results.[iv]

Fructans and starches vary according to the type of grasses. Cool season grasses and alfalfa tend to be higher in fructans, while warm season grasses accumulate starch. The sugar content of all grasses, however, can vary dramatically mainly based on environmental factors.

 

Bottom line

Pasture grazing is the best way to keep your horse healthy. Grasses are not only highly nutritious, but grazing supports both physical and mental health. Get to know your grasses and periodically have them analyzed to offer your horses grazing opportunities at the most opportune times and conditions.

 

This article updates and expands information in one of Dr. Getty’s previous Tips of the Month. Permission to reprint this article is granted, provided attribution is given to Juliet M. Getty, Ph.D. No editorial changes may be made without her permission. Dr. Getty appreciates being notified of any publication.

 

Juliet M. Getty, Ph.D. is an independent equine nutritionist with a wide U.S. and international following. Her research-based approach optimizes equine health by aligning physiology and instincts with correct feeding and nutrition practices. Dr. Getty’s goal is to empower the horseperson with the confidence and knowledge to provide the best nutrition for his or her horse’s needs.

 

Dr. Getty’s fundamental resource book, Feed Your Horse Like a Horse, is now in paperback as well as in hardcover, searchable CD and Kindle versions. All except the Kindle version are available at www.GettyEquineNutrition.com — buy the book there and have it inscribed by the author. Print and Kindle versions are also available at Amazon (www.Amazon.com); find print versions at other online retail bookstores. The seven individual volumes in Dr. Getty’s topic-centered “Spotlight on Equine Nutrition”series are available with special package pricing at her website, and also at Amazon in print and Kindle versions. Dr. Getty’s books make ideal gifts for equestrians!

 

Find a world of useful information for the horseperson at www.GettyEquineNutrition.com: Sign up for Dr. Getty’s informative, free e-newsletter, Forage for Thought; browse her library of reference articles; search her nutrition forum archives; and purchase recordings of her educational teleseminars. Find top-quality supplements, feeders, and other equine-related items, at her online Free Shipping Supplement Store[v]. Reach Dr. Getty directly at gettyequinenutrition@gmail.com.

 

 

[i] Watts, K., 2008. The influence of solar radiation and temperature on the diurnal fluctuation of NSC in grass. Rocky Mountain Research & Consulting, Inc. www.safergrass.org

[ii] Equi-Analytical Labs offers instructions on how to test your pasture. www.equi-analytical.com

[iii] Johnson, R.J., Rivard, C., Lanaspa, M.A., Otabachian-Smith, S., et. al., 2013. Fructokinase, fructans, intestinal permeability, and metabolic syndrome: An equine connection? Journal of Equine Veterinary Science, 33(2), 120-126.

[iv] Crawford, C., Sepulveda, M.F., Elliott, J., Harris, P.A., and Bailey, S.R., 2017. Dietary fructan carbohydrate increases amine production in the equine large intestine: Implications for pasture-associated laminitis. Journal of Animal Science, 85, 2949-2958.

[v] http://horsesupplements.gettyequinenutrition.biz

 

Longtime Breeder Judy Agular Obituary

Judy Louise Agular passed away suddenly on May 18, 2017 at the age of 66.  Her family and friends will dearly miss her kind and energetic spirit.

For many years Judy was involved in the thoroughbred industry in Louisiana as a breeder and owner of race horses.  A longtime member of the Louisiana Thoroughbred Breeders Association, she greatly enjoyed the many relationships she made in horse racing statewide, from the farm to the track.

Judy’s compassion was best expressed through her love of animals, including her many dogs, cats and horses, which she enthusiastically cared for.  Her concern with the welfare of thoroughbred horses led her to become actively involved with the Louisiana Horse Rescue Association, where she served as a Director, helping to raise awareness of aftercare for horses.

A memorial service will be held at 10:00 am on Thursday May 25th in Folsom, LA at Elite Thoroughbred Farm.

In lieu of flowers, donations are requested for the Louisiana Horse Rescue Association, P.O. Box 10204, New Orleans, LA 70181.

Desormeaux Splits With Pegram, Hires Nelson Arroyo As New Agent

Hall of Fame jockey Kent Desormeaux has parted ways with agent J.R. Pegram and teamed up with agent Nelson Arroyo, it was announced Monday. Desormeaux, who has been represented by Pegram since March 2016, was also previously represented by the agent in 2012 and 2013 while riding in New York.

“I’ve worked with Pegram a few times over the years and he’s done a good job for me,” Desormeaux said. “We have different views on managing my future, and as a result I thought it best to part ways. Nelson has done a great job as an agent and I am looking forward to him carrying my book.”

Desormeaux, who was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2004, is ranked sixth all-time in jockey earnings with $272,913,629, and has 5,856 wins from over 30,000 career starts. He has won seven Triple Crown races, including three Kentucky Derbies, three Preakness Stakes and the Belmont once.

After a second-place finish in last year’s Kentucky Derby aboard the Keith Desormeaux-trained Exaggerator, the pair went on to capture the Preakness Stakes, finishing 4 1/2 lengths ahead of Kentucky Derby winner Nyquist. He went on to pilot the colt to victory in the $1 million Haskell Invitational last July.

“Before I became a jockey my father encouraged me to watch and learn from Cordero, Pincay, Velazquez and Desormeaux,” Arroyo said. “I never imagined I’d be representing a Hall of Fame jockey and to be representing Kent, along with my brother Norberto, in Southern California is a dream come true.”

Desormeaux is currently riding at the Santa Anita Park meeting where he is fifth in the jockey standings. He rode three winners on the card there Sunday, including the Fran’s Valentine Stakes aboard Moonless Sky.