May Calendar of Events

 Louisiana Thoroughbred Breeders Association would like to share the following list of dates of interest to Louisiana horsemen and women.

Brought to you by Louisiana Thoroughbred Breeders Association, Whispering Oaks Farm, and Equine Sales CompanyClick images to link to more information

May 1

  • LTBA Board of Directors to meet with the Acadiana Caucus in Baton Rouge

May 3, 4, 5, 6

  • New Orleans Jazz Fest at the Fair Grounds

No visitors will be allowed access to New Orleans Office during these days.
We apologize for any inconvenience.

May 3

  • National Day of Prayer

May 4

  • Equine Sales Oaks, Evangeline Downs

May 5

  • Equine Sales Derby, Evangeline Downs
  • Louisiana Downs 2018 Thoroughbred Meet Opens
  • Kentucky Derby
  • Cinco De Mayo

May 6

  • Equine Sales Two Year Olds In Training Breeze Show
  • LTBA Annual Meeting and Awards Banquet, 5:00 p.m., at Equine Sales Facility, Opelousas, LA

May 7 

  • Equine Sales Two Year Olds In Training Sale
  • Nominations for LTBA Board of Directors due from LTBA membership. Resume and photo of prospective board members also due.

May 13

  •     Mothers Day

May 19

  •  Preakness Stakes
  • Armed Forces Day

May 21

  • LTBA 2017-18 Membership Forms mail

May 26

  • Louisiana Legends Night – Eight stakes races for Accredited Louisiana Bred Thoroughbreds worth total purses of $750,000

May 28

  • Memorial Day

May 31

  • Louisiana Futurity Forms mail

June 1

  • LTBA Board of Directors Ballots to be mailed out

Would you like to sponsor a newsletter? Reach nearly 3,000 readers.

Please contact Linda 985-386-0360, linda@louisianabred.com or Roger 504-947-4676, roger@louisianabred.com for cost and availability.

Do you have a date pertaining to Louisiana-breds that you would like included in an upcoming calendar? Please contact Linda 985-386-0360, linda@louisianabred.com or Roger 504-947-4676, roger@louisianabred.comfor consideration.

 

Any questions or need more info call

Roger A. Heitzmann III, Secretary/Treasurer

Louisiana Thoroughbred Breeders Association

504-947-4676, 800-772-1195

Equine Sales Company 2-Year-Old Sale Set for May 7

(Opelousas, Louisiana – April 30, 2018) — Equine Sales Company will present its 2-Year-Olds in Training Sale in Opelousas, Louisiana, on Monday, May 7, with a catalog of 73 head that includes several recent supplements. The sale will be held starting at 1 p.m. with the breeze show set for Sunday, May 6, at 10 a.m. Both the breeze show and sale will be broadcast live on the Equine Sales website, www.equinesalesofla.com, and breeze show replays will also be posted.
As always, the auction features offspring of many top Louisiana stallions, including Half Ours, Custom for Carlos and Star Guitar, and leading national sires including Flat Out (the sire of last year’s $110,000 sale-topper), Hard Spun and Shackleford. Also represented in the catalog are a slew of first-crop sires including Can the Man, Fed Biz, Flashback, Guilt Trip, Itsmyluckyday, Sabercat, Shakin’ It Up and Sum of The Parts.
Also on the schedule, the $75,000 Equine Sales Oaks will be held Friday, May 4, followed by the $75,000 Equine Sales Derby on Saturday, May 5, both at Evangeline Downs for graduates of last year’s 2-year-olds in training sale.
“There are top quality runners in both of those stakes that will showcase some of horses who went through the ring last year,” said Foster Bridewell, sales director. “I think this year’s catalog is even stronger, so I’m looking forward to seeing these horses at the breeze show and then at the races down the road.”
The sale catalog is online at www.equinesalesofla.com.

Lone Star’s Opening Night Handle Up 55 Percent Over 2017

Lone Star Park kicked off its 2018 Thoroughbred Season last week with notable increases in handle. Total handle on the opening night card was $1.5 million the highest single-day handle since Memorial Day 2011 and a 55% increase over opening day last year. The total handle for the 4-day combined opening weekend was the best since 2012 and climbing 26% over 2017.

Field sizes averaged 9.39 per race, considerably higher than the 2017 national average of 7.70 reported by The Jockey Club.

Lone Star Park’s purses are up nearly 14% from a year ago, partially supported by a reduction in race dates, plus an increase of the track’s 2017 all-sources handle. The purse increase has also attracted more horses than in recent years including a few new stables.

An upgrade conversion to high definition broadcast video distribution is in place and will help showcase what Lone Star Park has to offer.

Plans on the horizon to help continue the momentum include a schedule of select race days that feature Guaranteed Pick-4 Pools. The first on the schedule is Sunday, May 6, which features the Grade 3, $200,000 Steve Sexton Mile. Lone Star Park will offer advance wagering on Kentucky Derby Day for the entire card as well as a $50,000 Guaranteed Late Pick-4 Pool.

LTBA LEGISLATIVE ALERT! House Bill 833

LTBA Contact:
Roger Heitzmann
(504) 947-4676
roger@louisianabred.com
 

April 27, 2018

LTBA LEGISLATIVE ALERT!  House Bill 833

This Bill ELIMINATES 50% of the Video Draw Poker Purse Supplement Fund which will reduce Louisiana Bred Purses and Breeders Awards paid

House Bill 833 by Representative Jay Morris is scheduled for Tuesday morning (May 1st @ 9:30 AM) in the House Committee on Appropriations

Please contact members of the House Committee on Appropriations (see list below) and ask them to support our Horse Breeding & Racing Industry by voting NO on House Bill 833.

Thank you,
Louisiana Thorougbred Breeders Association

 

Louisiana House of Representative
Appropriations

Representative Office Address Office Phone District
Henry, Cameron
Chairman
1539 Metairie Road
Suite A
Metairie, LA 70005
504-838-5433 82
Foil, Franklin
Vice Chair
412 N. 4th St Suite 220
Baton Rouge, LA 70802
225-342-6777 70
Abraham, Mark
Member
130 Jamestown Road
Lake Charles, LA 70605
337-475-3016 36
Amedee, Beryl
Member
302 School Street
Houma, LA 70360
985-858-2967 51
Armes, James
Member
2255 University Pkwy
Leesville, LA 71446
337-238-7004 30
Bacala, Tony
Member
15482 Airline Hwy.  Suite A
Prairieville, LA 70769
225-677-8020 59
Bagley, Larry
Member
671 Hwy. 171  Suite E
Stonewall, LA 71078
318-925-9588 7
Berthelot, John
Member
1024 S. Purpera
Gonzales, LA 70737
225-647-5646 88
Billiot, Robert
Member
#10 Westbank Expressway
Westwego, LA 70094
504-436-8929 83
Carter, Gary
Member
3520 General DeGaulle  Suite 3071
New Orleans, LA 70114
504-361-6600 102
Chaney, Charles
Member
P.O. Box 8
Rayville, LA 71269
318-728-5875 19
Edmonds, Rick
Member
3931 S. Sherwood Forest Blvd.   Suite 200
Baton Rouge, LA 70816
225-295-9240 66
Falconer, Reid
Member
4990 Highway 22  Sutie E
Mandeville, LA 70471
985-792-5185 89
Harris, Lance
Member
P.O. Box 13555
Alexandria, LA 71315
318-767-6095 25
Hensgens, Bob
Member
407 Charity Street
Abbeville, LA 70510
337-893-5035 47
Hodges, Valarie
Member
35055 LA Hwy 16  Suite 2A
Denham Springs, LA 70706
225-791-2199 64
Leger, Walt III
Member
935 Gravier St.  Sutie 2155
New Orleans, LA 70112
504-556-9970 91
McFarland, Jack
Member
P.O. Box 143
Jonesboro, LA 71251
318-259-4275 13
Miguez, Blake
Member
410 North Broadway St.
Erath, LA 70533
337-937-8827 49
Miller, Dustin
Member
1115 S. Union St.
Opelousas, LA 70570
337-943-2900 40
Pylant, Steve E.
Member
805 Jackson St.  Suite A
Winnsboro, LA 71295
318-435-7313 20
Richard, Jerome
Member
907 Jackson St.
Thibodaux, LA 70301
985-447-0999 55
Simon, Scott
Member
P.O. Box 1297
Abita Springs, LA 70420
985-893-6246 74
Smith, Patricia
Member
251 Florida St.   Suite 300
Baton Rouge, LA 70801
225-342-7106 67
Zeringue, Jerome
Member
423 Goode St.
Houma, LA 70360
985-876-8823 52
For more information, please call 1-800-772-1195 or visit louisianabred.com.

Oaklawn Posts Double-Digit Handle Increase Behind Record Prep Days

Led by record-setting GI Arkansas Derby and GII Rebel S. days, Oaklawn Park reported an 11% increase in total handle during its recently-concluded 2018 season.

An estimated crowd of 64,500 turned out Apr. 14 to watch undefeated ‘TDN Rising Star’ Magnum Moon (Malibu Moon) capture the GI Arkansas Derby, contributing to a total handle of $16,159,771 on the 12-race card, a figure that broke the previous single-day record of $15,133,537 set on Arkansas Derby day in 2000. Four weeks earlier, 37,500 saw Magnum Moon capture the Rebel on a day that handled $10,771,984, the highest non-Arkansas Derby Day yield in the 114-year history of the track.

“Despite missing two days due to weather in January and 16 inches of rain in February, we are extremely excited to have ended the meet with a double-digit increase in handle,” General Manager Wayne Smith said. “It’s a testament to the great product we were able to put on the track this season. I want to thank the owners, trainers and jockeys who put on the greatest show in racing. I also want to thank our entire management team and staff for such an incredible season. Most of all, a huge thank you goes out to our fans for their continued support.”

The Hot Springs oval raced 55 of 57 days for total handle of $209,695,403. The average total daily handle of $3,812,644 was up 15% over 2017. Export handle also saw the big gains during the 2018 season, growing by 15% to $175,125,149 despite racing two fewer days than 2017.

Oaklawn will start a new tradition in 2019 when it opens Friday, Jan. 25 and continues its season through Saturday, May 3, marking the first time that the track has raced after Arkansas Derby Day. The 2019 Arkansas Derby will be run Saturday, Apr. 13.

AHC Announces Safe Sport Code of Practice

April 24, 2018

The American Horse Council (AHC) is pleased to announce the adoption of a Safe Sport Code of Practice.

“The reputation and integrity of equestrian sports and all equine related programs and activities is maintained when all person’s act, and are seen to act, in a way which is of the highest ethical standards,” said AHC President Julie Broadway. “The #MeToo and #TimesUp movements have further brought to light the importance of maintaining a safe environment for all, and the equine industry is no exception to this.”

This Code of Practice, unanimously endorse by the AHC Board of Trustees reads:

To behave ethically necessitates an awareness of power differentials among all persons involved. This statement is intended to inform ethical judgments as persons consider asymmetric power relations among themselves and others they work with in professional roles. We recognize that this statement’s strength and requisite influence depend on its circulation, discussion, reflection, and use by the equine industry. It is the industry’s expectation that all equine organizations recognize “Protecting Young Victims from Sexual Abuse and Safe Sport Authorization Act of 2017” and US Center for Safe Sport, and adopt programs to support these initiatives.

The American Horse Council and its members are:

  • Committed to contributing to an environment, which makes participation a positive and rewarding experience.
  • Committed to creating and maintaining a community where all persons who participate in equine related programs and activities can work, learn and compete in an atmosphere free of all forms of emotional, physical and sexual harassment and misconduct.
  • Committed to protecting the rights, safety, dignity, and well-being of the persons involved in all aspects of our industry, thus condemning all forms of harassment regardless of whether it is based on age, ethnicity, race, gender identity or expression, sexual orientation, disability, religion or marital status.
  • Committed to providing just treatment in cases of disputes and that there are proper and accessible mechanisms that are available in a timely manner to resolve disputed issues through due process.

A PDF of the Code can also be found on the AHC’s website here: http://www.horsecouncil.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/Safe-Sport-Code-of-Practice.pdf

A tentative presentation by the U.S. Center for Safe Sport and a roundtable discussion will be held at the AHC’s National Issues Forum on Tuesday, June 12th in Washington, DC to identify best practices and tools to support this practice. Information about the National Issues Forum can be found on the AHC’s website here: http://www.horsecouncil.org/events/ahc-annual-meeting-national-issues-forum-2/.

Possible Link Between Selenium and Cribbing In Horses

by

 

Stereotypic behaviors such as weaving, cribbing, and stall-walking occur commonly in high-performance horses as well as many companion horses. In addition to being unsightly, potentially damaging to the barn, and raising welfare concerns, stereotypic behaviors also result in important health issues such as dental disorders, temporohyoid joint damage, poor performance, weight loss, and colic.

“Cribbing is the most troublesome of these compulsive behaviors. It involves grasping a fixed object with the incisor teeth and aspirating air with an audible grunt,” explained Kathleen Crandell, Ph.D., a nutritionist for Kentucky Equine Research.

The exact reason horses crib remains unknown. Some suggest that cribbing horses have unmet dietary or management needs. Others believe that altered biological functions are the culprits, such as decreased antioxidant levels or increased oxidative stress.

Because trace elements such as selenium, zinc, manganese, and copper protect the body from oxidative stress, one research group* recently explored the hypothesis that oxidation status may contribute to cribbing. To test this theory, blood samples were collected from horses during or immediately after an episode of cribbing and when cribbers were resting. Control horses with no known history of cribbing were also tested. Samples were analyzed for various markers of oxidation.

“The most important finding in this study was that serum selenium concentration was significantly lower in cribbing horses than in controls, with the lowest levels measured while horses were actually cribbing,” Crandell said.

Based on these data, the researchers concluded “that alterations in serum selenium, an important component of the antioxidant system, may play a role in the pathophysiology of cribbing behavior in horses, adding further evidence to the theory that cribbing may be related to increased oxidative stress and alterations in essential trace elements.”

Micronutrients imbalances can affect many physiological processes, which is one reason why Kentucky Equine Research nutrition advisors are available for consultation. They can help with feed analysis, recommend ration fortifiers containing vitamins and minerals such as Micro-Max (Gold Pellet in Australia), and antioxidants such as Nano•E, a water-soluble, natural-source of vitamin E, and Preserve PS (Preserve in Australia) to provide natural-source vitamin E, vitamin C, and other antioxidants.

“Management also plays an important part in minimizing stereotypic behaviors. Strategies such as providing environmental enrichment tools, offering free-choice hay or prolonged grazing, and allowing direct visual contact or prolonged turnout time in groups are thought to improve the welfare of affected horses,” Crandell mentioned.

*Omidi, A., R. Jafari, N. Saeed, et al. 2018. Potential role for selenium in the pathophysiology of crib-biting behavior in horses. Journal of Veterinary Behavior 23:10-14.

Article reprinted courtesy of Kentucky Equine Research (KER). Visit equinews.com for the latest in equine nutrition and management, and subscribe to The Weekly Feed to receive these articles directly (equinews.com/newsletters).   

CHURCHILL DOWNS ANNOUNCES NEW DERBY WEEK ENTRY PROCEDURES & SECURITY MEASURES

Track encourages guests to visit KentuckyDerbyParking.com for parking, arrival & entry information

LOUISVILLE, Ky. – Churchill Downs Racetrack (“Churchill Downs”), home of the world-famous Kentucky Derby, announced today new entry procedures that will be in effect for guests visiting the track any day of Derby Week (Saturday, April 28, 2018 through Saturday, May 5, 2018). The track unveiled its new parking and traffic plan last week and launched KentuckyDerbyParking.com to help visitors plan their arrival.

“Churchill Downs has invested heavily to improve the arrival and entry experience for all our guests and employees. We want to ensure a safe and secure environment, while helping people get in and out of the venue as efficiently as possible,” said Kevin Flanery, president of Churchill Downs Racetrack. “We encourage everyone joining us for Derby Week to visit KentuckyDerbyParking.com so you know exactly what to expect before you get to the track.”

Derby Week visitors will be the first to use Churchill Downs’ new expanded entry plaza, which will lead guests from Central Avenue to the newly constructed Paddock Gate that’s replacing previous entrances at Gates 1 and 17.

Churchill Downs has renamed its admission gates to reflect their locations in the venue. Ticket holders will enter Churchill Downs through one of three admission gates: the new Paddock Gate, the Clubhouse Gate (formerly Gate 10) and the Infield Gate (formerly Gate 3). The Infield Gate will only be available to guests with a General Admission ticket. All others will enter through the Paddock or Clubhouse Gates.

Once ticket holders arrive at Churchill Downs, a new entry process will help them enter the track safely and efficiently:

  1. To ensure the safety and security of all Churchill Downs guests and employees, anyone entering the track will walk through metal detectors as part of the security screening measures. Prohibited items are not allowed past the security screening area.
  2. Next, guests entering through the Paddock or Clubhouse Gates will scan their ticket at one of the new self-scanning entry turnstiles. Or, if someone has a General Admission ticket and is entering through the Infield Gate, an attendant will scan their ticket by hand. Once inside the track, guests are not allowed to leave the venue and reenter.
  3. Once a ticket is scanned, guests will proceed through the turnstile and follow staff direction and new signs from the admission gate to their seating section or venue.
  4. As guests make their way to their seating section, they will be greeted by an usher at the appropriate access control point. The usher will scan the ticket for a second time, stub the ticket and then apply an official wristband around their wrist. This wristband allows guests to come and go from their seating section throughout the day. Each ticket may only be scanned once at the wristband locations and must scan as valid to receive a wristband.
New this year, special quick entry lanes have been added to the security screening areas of all admission gates for those guests who are not bringing a bag of any type into the venue.

Additionally, guests with mobile tickets purchased through the official Ticketmaster Resale Marketplace will follow the same entry process as guests with printed tickets and will receive their wristband at the access control point.

Churchill Downs released a short video letting guests know what to expect before entering the track: https://youtu.be/jNOrSBjuZAU

In keeping with tradition, guests on Oaks and Derby Days are permitted to bring in food and box lunches in clear plastic bags smaller than 18 inches by 18 inches. However, these items are prohibited Opening Night (Saturday, April 28) through Thurby (Thursday, May 3).

Prohibited items and items deemed inappropriate for entry into the grounds are the responsibility of the ticketholder and cannot be accepted or checked by Churchill Downs. We urge patrons to plan ahead and leave these items at home. Churchill Downs and its security partners will not store prohibited items for patrons. The full list of prohibited and permitted items can be found at KentuckyDerbyParking.com.

PROHIBITED ITEMS FOR DERBY WEEK (Opening Night through Kentucky Derby Day)
• COOLERS AT ANY GATE – including the Stable Gate (styrofoam coolers and ice are available for purchase in the Infield)
• CANS (any size or type)
• GLASS BOTTLES OR CONTAINERS

• BACKPACKS and DUFFEL BAGS
• TENTS – NO POLES OR STAKES OF ANY KIND
• LAPTOP COMPUTERS and CAMCORDERS
• CAMERAS WITH DETACHABLE LENSES OR EQUIPPED WITH A LENS THAT IS 6” OR LARGER
• DRONES and REMOTE-CONTROLLED AIRCRAFT
• HOVERBOARDS
• PURSES LARGER THAN 12” IN ANY DIMENSION
• FIREWORKS, NOISEMAKERS, AIR HORNS, LASER LIGHTS/POINTERS, PEPPER SPRAYS
• ANIMALS (with the exception of service animals for guests with special needs)
• TRIPODS
• SELFIE STICKS                                                      
• ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
• ILLEGAL SUBSTANCES
• WEAPONS (including knives)                                                     
• THERMOSES                                                   
• LUGGAGE (including briefcases)
• GRILLS
• WAGONS                                                                                    
• UMBRELLAS
• ANY ITEMS DEEMED DANGEROUS AND/OR INAPPROPRIATE

PERMITTED ITEMS FOR KENTUCKY DERBY AND OAKS DAYS
• FOOD ITEMS IN CLEAR PLASTIC BAGS (maximum size 18”x 18” – no trash bags) *
• BOX LUNCHES in clear plastic bags or containers (maximum size 18” x 18” – no trash bags)
• WATER & SOFT DRINKS – plastic bottles only (sealed, clear and unopened)
• PURSES, BUT NONE LARGER THAN 12” IN ANY DIMENSION (subject to search)
• BABY/DIAPER BAGS – only if accompanied by a child (subject to search)
• SMALL CAMERAS – none equipped with detachable lenses or lenses of 6” or more **
• SMALL PERSONAL MUSIC SYSTEMS, RADIOS & TELEVISIONS ** (no boomboxes) ***
• CELLULAR PHONES, SMARTPHONES & TABLETS **
• SEAT CUSHIONS SMALLER THAN 15”x 15” – no metal arms and/or backs, zippers, pockets or flaps                         
• STROLLERS (ONLY if carrying a child)
• SUNSCREEN (non-glass containers only)
• CHAIRS (permitted through the Infield Gate ONLY and cannot be carried to the frontside)
• BINOCULARS
• BLANKETS & TARPAULINS (Paddock and Infield Gates ONLY)

* Limit of two bags per person
** Patrons could be required to turn on electronic items
*** Not permitted in hospitality spaces and dining rooms

For more information on arrival, parking and entry, please visit KentuckyDerbyParking.com and download the Churchill Downs and Waze mobile apps.

EQUINE SALES CO. 2YO SALE CATALOGS NOW ON-LINE

Catalogs for Equine Sales Company 2018 Two-Year-Old In-Training Sale with Horses of Racing Age have been mailed and are now online at www.equinesalesofla.com. or for a direct link, click here.

Supplements are still being accepted for the sale and the catalog is being updated daily.

Sale Date:  Monday, May 7, 2018
Breeze Show:  Sunday, May 6, 2018

 

Consignment contracts can be downloaded by clicking this link:

 

You can visit our website:(www.equinesalesofla.com) or you can contact Equine Sales Company by email (sales@equinesalesofla.com) or call:  337-678-3024.
SAVE THE DATES FOR THESE UPCOMING SALES!!
 
2018 Consignor Select Yearling Sale
Thursday,September 6, 2018
2018 Open Yearling & Mixed Sale
Sunday, October 28, 2018
Equine Sales Company
Office:  337-678-3024 * Fax:  337-678-3028
Sale Director:  Foster Bridewell
Cell:  214-718-7618

Equine Biological Passports: Years Away, But Receiving Industry Support

by

04.12.2018

 

The Kentucky Equine Drug Research Council (KEDRC) unanimously voted this week to allocate $15,000 to funding ongoing research into biological passport. Although the technology is at least a couple of years from implementation, Dr. Scott Stanley of the University of California-Davis said the passports could solve several problems in drug testing.

Regulators face particular challenges testing for long-acting prohibited substances like erythropoietin (EPO) and drugs creating steroid-like effects in the body. EPO in particular withdraws from the blood very quickly, but its impact (increasing the concentration of oxygen-carrying red blood cells in the body) lingers considerably longer. Both steroids and blood doping agents also tend to be used repeatedly but often weeks in advance of a race. Out-of-competition testing can act as a deterrent for these substances, but regulators still have a short window to actually find a positive level of the drugs in the horse’s system.

Biological passports track the responses of proteins and biomarkers to the administration of drugs like these even after the drugs themselves are gone. Stanley said the technology also gets around a common concern on the part of horsemen: what if a given horse, through no manipulation, is a natural outlier in the range of ‘normal’ for a hormone or protein? Sampling for passports would be taken repeatedly over an extended period of time, allowing regulators to compare a given reading not just with the normal range of the whole population, but also to the horse’s own previous readings.

Before the technology is ready for use at the racetrack though, Stanley and other researchers have to look at a range of markers in the equine body to decide which are the truest indicators of drug administration. Hormones and blood levels fluctuate naturally in response to the time of day, the season, and maybe a horse’s location.

Initial tests on a research horse looking at P27425 (an iron binding protein) produced exactly the results scientists expected. They plan to collect data from 50 to 100 horses in California in over one or more years to see how biomarkers behave in horses and which are the most consistent. When passport testing begins, Stanley anticipates a cross-section of horses will need to be sampled on a monthly basis in addition to post-race readings. As a greater cache of data is collected and stored, the monthly testing will become unnecessary.

The California Horse Racing Board and Grayson-Jockey Club Foundation have already provided funding to the project.

Dr. Andy Roberts, member of the KEDRC, questioned whether different (completely legal) training or feed routines could also cause a noticeable change in a horse’s passport levels. Stanley said it’s possible they could, so changes in passport readings would need to be taken as just a piece of the greater puzzle in what’s going on with a horse.

“Right now we would definitely see it as [a tool to initiate] an investigation: ‘This horse has been flagged for further follow-up’ and we’d get additional sequential samples from that to see if that horse is naturally outside the normal boundary,” said Stanley. “In the future, I think we could have enough additional data to say, ‘The upstream and downstream changes are not consistent with anything other than an administration.’ We just don’t have that data definitively yet to say what those changes should be.”

Unfortunately for equine researchers, the work that has been done on human biological passports with regard to blood-doping agents doesn’t seem as though it will be applicable to horses. The equine spleen is considerably different from that of humans, and its ability to suddenly contract with exertion causes changes in blood levels that would not be typical in a human.

The good thing about biological passports for racing regulators is that the technology won’t care what type of drug a trainer may have used to influence red blood cells or muscle tone, since they measure the body’s reaction instead of the size of drug molecules.

Like drug testing however, Stanley cautioned biological passports will be a constantly-evolving scientific process – but one that could have major impacts on integrity down the road.

“It isn’t a short-term project. It is years-long to get enough data,” he said. “The whole project is underfunded and it would take a long time even if it was fully-funded. I suspect we’ll be looking at more data in a couple years rather than a couple weeks.”

“The long-term intent is to provide deterrence. I truly believe that drug testing is about deterrence. We want to convince people we can test for everything and anything at any concentration that is prohibited. Just as we’re doing in Quarter Horse racing with a lot of hair testing right now, we would like to prevent [violators] from racing rather than penalize them after the race as an unfair competition.”