CHURCHILL DOWNS AND KEENELAND ANNOUNCE HISTORIC PARTNERSHIP TO PROPOSE CONSTRUCTION OF TWO NEW RACING FACILITIES IN CORBIN AND OAK GROVE, KENTUCKY

LOUISVILLE, Ky. – Churchill Downs Incorporated (NASDAQ: CHDN) (“CDI”) and Keeneland Association, Inc. (“Keeneland”) announced today an historic partnership to propose the construction of two new state-of-the-art racing facilities. One will be in southeastern Kentucky in Corbin (Knox County), and the second will be in southwestern Kentucky in Oak Grove (Christian County). The proposed facilities will feature live horse racing and historical racing machines for guests from Kentucky and beyond.

To share the news, the two companies released a video featuring CDI Chief Executive Officer Bill Carstanjen, Keeneland President and Chief Executive Officer Bill Thomason, Kentucky Thoroughbred Association Executive Director Chauncey Morris and Kentucky Horsemen’s Benevolent and Protective Association Executive Director Marty Maline.

“Horse racing is a $4 billion industry in the Commonwealth that creates thousands of jobs, strengthens our statewide economy and attracts millions of visitors from around the globe,” Carstanjen said. “Churchill Downs and Keeneland share a deep commitment to making Kentucky’s horse racing industry the very best version of itself, and the new racing facilities in Corbin and Oak Grove will help us achieve this by generating much needed funds to increase purses and breeders’ incentives.”

“Keeneland is excited to partner with Churchill Downs on this initiative which builds upon our mission to strengthen the sport and create new opportunities for horsemen and fans,” Thomason said. “Not only will these racing facilities strengthen Kentucky’s vital horse industry, but just as importantly, they will positively impact the Commonwealth and the local communities by stimulating significant economic growth, generating hundreds of new jobs and enhancing tourism and hospitality.”

Churchill Downs and Keeneland are working closely with the Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet and other state and local officials on a number of incentives and necessary infrastructure improvements to bring the Corbin and Oak Grove facilities to fruition.

“Corbin is thrilled to be a part of this historic venture between two of the horse racing industry’s most iconic names,” Corbin Mayor Willard McBurney said. “The new racing facility will be a welcome addition to our city’s already long list of sites and attractions for local residents and visitors.”

“We are proud of the significant investment Churchill Downs and Keeneland are committed to making in our community, and are excited to see the infusion of tourism, economic development and new jobs it will bring to Oak Grove and Christian County,” Oak Grove Mayor Bea Burt said.

Each facility is contingent on receipt of an initial pari-mutuel racing license by the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission, and Churchill Downs and Keeneland are filing their applications with the commission today.

“Churchill Downs and Keeneland have the support of the Kentucky Thoroughbred Association as they move forward with their plans to bring two new racing facilities to our state,” Morris said. “The proposed facilities will benefit our industry and the Commonwealth as a whole through new jobs, greater revenues and more tourism.”

“The Kentucky Horsemen’s Benevolent and Protective Association is excited for what this announcement means for our sport,” Maline said. “We represent more than 6,000 owners and trainers who depend on a strong racing industry, and we know this historic partnership will help draw the eyes of millions to Kentucky’s signature industry.”

For more information, please watch this short video and visit www.historicpartnership.com.


Initial rendering of the proposed Corbin facility

Initial rendering of the proposed Oak Grove facility
About Churchill Downs Incorporated
Churchill Downs Incorporated (NASDAQ: CHDN) (“CDI”), headquartered in Louisville, Ky., is an industry-leading racing, gaming and online entertainment company anchored by our iconic flagship event—The Kentucky Derby. We are a leader in brick-and-mortar casino gaming with gaming positions in eight states, and we are the largest legal mobile betting platform for horseracing in the U.S., through our ownership of TwinSpires.com. We are also one of the world’s largest producers and distributors of mobile games through Big Fish Games, Inc. Additional information about CDI can be found online at www.churchilldownsincorporated.com.

About Keeneland Association, Inc.
For more than 80 years, the Keeneland Association has devoted itself to the health and vibrancy of the Thoroughbred industry. As the world’s largest Thoroughbred auction company, Keeneland conducts sales every January, September and November. Its sales graduates dominate racing across the globe at every level. In April and October, Keeneland offers some of the highest caliber and richest Thoroughbred racing in the world. In 2015, Keeneland hosted the Breeders’ Cup World Championships. Uniquely structured, Keeneland is a private, for-profit corporation that returns its earnings to the industry and the community in the form of higher purses, and it has donated millions of dollars in charitable contributions for education, research and health and human services throughout Central Kentucky. To learn more about Keeneland, visit Keeneland.com.

Final Jockey Assignments Confirmed In 2017 Run For The Roses: Includes Three Louisiana Natives

by | 04.30.2017 | 3:05pm

Always Dreaming works under the Twin Spires with John Velazquez aboard.

The last of the Kentucky Derby riding assignments was confirmed on Sunday morning, and the current field of 20 is all booked up for Saturday’s Run for the Roses. The most recent addition is that of jockey Channing Hill aboard Fast and Accurate for trainer Mike Maker; Hill breezed the colt at Churchill Downs on Sunday morning, then announced the decision later in the morning on Twitter.

Tyler Gaffalione will be aboard the Todd Pletcher-trained Patch for Calumet Farm, it was also announced on Twitter Sunday morning. Pletcher’s other riders were announced over the past few weeks, with John Velazquez scheduled to team with Always Dreaming and Jose Ortiz to pilot Tapwrit.

Trainer Steve Asmussen confirmed his final Derby reinsmen on Saturday, naming Ricardo Santana to ride Untrapped and Corey Lanerie to ride Lookin at Lee. Florent Geroux had previously been named to ride Hence.

Late last week, trainer Dale Romans named Luis Saez as the replacement rider for the injured Robby Albarado aboard J Boys Echo.

 

Here is the full list of expected Kentucky Derby contenders and their riders, as of Sunday afternoon:

  • Always Dreaming (John Velazquez)
  • Battle of Midway (Flavien Prat)
  • Classic Empire (Julien Leparoux)
  • Fast and Accurate (Channing Hill)
  • Girvin (Mike Smith)
  • Gormley (Victor Espinoza)
  • Gunnevera (Javier Castellano)
  • Hence (Florent Geroux)
  • Irap (Mario Gutierrez)
  • Irish War Cry (Rajiv Maragh)
  • J Boys Echo (Luis Saez)
  • Lookin At Lee (Corey Lanerie)
  • McCraken (Brian Hernandez Jr.)
  • Patch (Tyler Gaffalione)
  • Practical Joke (Joel Rosario)
  • Sonneteer (Kent Desormeaux)
  • State of Honor (Jose Lezcano)
  • Tapwrit (Jose Ortiz)
  • Thunder Snow (Ire) (Christophe Soumillon)
  • Untrapped (Ricardo Santana Jr.).

Next up in order of preference: Royal Mo (Gary Stevens)

The Elite Program, Inc. to Present Two April Courses

Subject: Two important classes in April 2017; 

What/When/Where: 

Trainers Exam Prep Class at Lone Star Park April 5-7
Basic Grooming Workforce Preparation, Kenny McPeek’s Magdalena Farm, Lexington, KY April 17-21

Information: www.groomelite.com; www.purplepowerracing.com

The Elite Program, Inc. through it’s Groom Elite™ programming will present two important classes in April to be taught by National lead instructor and Executive Director, C. Reid McLellan, PhD.  McLellan  will conduct his popular Trainers’ Exam Prep Class at Lone Star Park for a 17th time from April 5-7. Two weeks later, April 17-21, “Dr. Mac” will be lead instructor for an inaugural Basic Grooming 099, a workforce preparation class at Magdalena Farms in Lexington, Ky.

 

Lone Star Park Trainers Exam Prep Class

The Lone Star Park Trainers Exam Prep Class will be held in the Chaplain’s classroom in the Lone Star Park racing office for three days immediately following the Texas Thoroughbred Associations two-year old in training sale on April 4. Tuition is $350 and participants that register early and pay tuition before March 24th pay a discounted rate of $299.

This will be the 17th class McLellan has taught at Lone Star Park. Over 120 have participated in this class including Texas based trainer Janine Winslow, a member of the fist Lone Star Park class in 1998. Winslow saddled winners at Delta Downs and Sam Houston in February 2017. McLellan, has instructed trainers since he established an award winning equine program at Louisiana Tech University in the 1980’s. Dr. Mac is an engaging speaker who spices up otherwise dull material with personal experiences and discussion of rule changes that effect those desiring to become trainers. Information and registration online at www.groomelite.com or www.purplepowerracing.com.

 

Basic Grooming 099

Basic Grooming 099 is a 16-hour hands on class designed for people with limited (or no) horse experience who would like to take advantage of the many job openings in the Equine Industry. Class will  be held at Kenny McPeek’s Magdalena Farms on Russell Cave Road in Lexington. McPeek and others will participate as their schedules allow. “I’ll be there every  day”, McPeek tweeted (@Kenny McPeek.}

Class is being held during the Keeneland meeting  and participants will have an opportunity to attend the races and see grooms and hotwalkers in action Wednesday or Thursday.

Participants will learn how to work safely with horses, starting with approaching safely, haltering and leading. The four day (4 hours per day) class will include daily hands on practice. Participants will demonstrate on Friday what they have learned. Each person completing the course that is interested in applying for a job in the equine industry, will be evaluated and counseled as to their readiness to work with horses. In addition, contact information of trainers and farms with job openings will be provided. Elite Program staff will assist participants in finding jobs compatible with their skill level and confidence. In addition to McPeek’s Magdalena Farm, Basic Grooming 099 is sponsored in part by The Jockey Club, TOBA (though its Thoroughbred Charities of America), NTRA and the Race for Education. As a result, tuition for this class will be only $99. Class size is limited to the first 20 signing up and paying a $25 deposit to hold a spot. The remaining $74 is due April 14th . Anyone out of work and in need of a job can register and request assistance with tuition. “If a person wants to work in our equine industry we want to provide them the training necessary for them to be qualified to apply for those jobs”, McLellan stated.

A waiting list will be established if class is over subscribed. Those interested are encouraged to go to  www.groomelite.com and sign up.  Anyone without internet access is invited to call 859-252-8648 (Race for Education) or Dr. McLellan at 859-321-4377 and sign up over the phone.

The Elite Program, Inc. is a 501(C)3 non-profit that provides equine education classes through it’s Groom Elite™ curriculum.  With its initial primary mission (in 2001) to provide education to grooms and hotwalkers or Thoroughbred and Quarter Horse Racehorses, Groom Elite continually adapts and updates it’s programming that now includes courses for grooms and owners of OTTB show horses and welcomes owners and grooms of any breed. One of it’s more noteable programs is its Second Chances Groom Elite curriculum taught in five adult correctional facilities in partnership with the Thoroughbred Retirement Foundation and it’s local affiliates in which participants learn life lessons while developing an employable skill working with retired racehorses.

EHV-1: KY Dept. Of Agriculture Issues Revised Protocol For Horses Shipping In From Louisiana

“Earlier this year, in response to the EHV-I outbreak at Fair Grounds Race Track in New Orleans and pursuant to 302 KAR 20:040, we initiated a directive addressing horses originating from or having been stabled in the past 30 days at a premises in Louisiana where EHV-I infection had been diagnosed. The directive required these horses test negative prior to gaining entry onto a Kentucky racetrack or associated training facilities. Our objective in requiring this testing was to help us better define (understand) what if any elevated risks horses originating from these environments might pose to our equine populations here in Kentucky. Unfortunately, the reluctance of trainers to test their horses to qualify for movement to KY has not provided enough testing of those horses to enable us to conclude the risk is not elevated. With the lack of needed evidence, we do today continue to have concern that allowing unrestricted and less regulated movement of those horses to a Kentucky track continues to pose elevated risk (albeit undefined) of disease introduction to our racing environments.

“We did last week initiate conversation with regulators and animal health officials in Louisiana, and they shared their thought and comments that they are not aware of suspicion of EHV1 cases on the track. Additionally, there has apparently been a number of horses moved from Fair Grounds to other racing jurisdictions, and we’ve had no reports of disease events having occurred in those jurisdictions.

“Appreciating, while there remains concern today, we do have an identified need to facilitate interstate movement of horses from those environments to KY race tracks is a safe and efficient manner. Based on the above factors we are today amending our directive by removing the requirement that horses originating from (or having recently resided) Fair Grounds be tested prior to entry onto the track. We will though continue to require these horses (Fair Grounds) to enter Kentucky via an Entry Permit (described below) issued by our office and recorded on the CVI. Copies of this CVI and the EIA testing certificate are to be on file in the track’s stable office and a copy also available in the barn. Post arrival, temperatures for each horse are to be taken three times daily and recorded on an individual log sheet that is to be maintained in the barn. Regulatory and/or track officials will be making periodic visits to the barn.

“Feel free to contact us should you have any question, comment or concern regarding this revised directive.

“Qualifying Horses to Move from Fair Grounds in New Orleans LA onto KY Race Tracks = Effective Wednesday, March 15, 2017

1. A licensed accredited veterinarian shall examine and issue a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (CVI) within the day preceding a horse’s departure from Fair Grounds*.
2. The veterinarian issuing the CVI shall obtain an entry permit from the Office of KY State Veterinarian 502-782-5901, Monday – Friday, 8:00 am – 4:00 pm (EST).
3. The issuing accredited veterinarian shall record the entry permit number on the CVI.
4. The issuing accredited veterinarian shall record the EHV-1 vaccination on the CVI.
5. A statement is to be included that each horse(s) listed on the CVI has not demonstrated any evidence of infectious illness during the preceding 30 days nor exposure to any such illness.
6. Trainers shall provide to the stable office copies of the CVI and EIA test certificates in addition to keeping a copy of each document in the trainer’s assigned barn. These documents will be presented to regulatory and/or track officials when requested.
7. Animal health officials, racing officials and track officials will be conducting random inspection of horses, the stabling environment and applicable health documents that does include temperature logs during the race meet.
8. These requirements shall remain in effect until further notice.”

*or having been located at Fair Grounds during the 30 days preceding departure for Kentucky

Concerns Over Nocardioform Placentitis For Kentucky Foal Crop On The Rise

by  | 02.01.2017 | 7:32am 

Pregnant_Mare

A rise in nocardioform placentitis cases in Central Kentucky’s 2011 foal crop caused concern among equine caretakers, veterinarians and the University of Kentucky Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory (UKVDL). A placental infection that can cause late-term abortion or small, underdeveloped foals, the disease could take a toll on the Thoroughbred breeding industry.

The UKVDL reported via The Horse that in 2012, the number of confirmed cases dropped to a more-typical number, but that the 2016 crop had a small rise in cases in February before numbers dropped quickly later that year.

Though 2017 has just begun, the UKVDL has seen an increase in confirmed nocardioform placentitis cases, beginning with 10 abortions in December 2016 (compared to zero abortions in December 2015). Additionally, there were eight confirmed cases in the first two weeks of January 2017, with additional cases pending.

First identified in Central Kentucky in the mid-1980s, the development of nocardioform placentitis is not well understood. It can cause stillbirths, prematurity, late-gestation abortions, live but non-viable foals, and foals that are small and weak, but live. The lesions of nocardioform placentitis are distinctive and are gram-positive branching bacilli; they are found only on the placenta and do not reach the fetus.

It is not clearly understood how nocardioform placentitis is transmitted as the infection does not follow the transmission path of either ascending bacterial placentitis or septicemic bacterial placentitis. The cases tend to come in waves with some years having more cases than other. Scientists are investigating if environmental factors contribute to the disease. So far, nocardioform placentitis seems to occur after hot, dry weather.

Read more at The Horse.

KEEP Conference: Facilitate Horse Encounters

By , BloodHorse Daily

 

With the continued urbanization of the United States, speakers at the first Kentucky Equine Education Project industry conference Oct. 18 in Lexington said it’s more important than ever for industry participants to reach out to the general public to help facilitate a connection to horses.

“We sometimes forget that while we get to see horses every day, the vast majority of the world does not,” said Price Bell of Mill Ridge Farm and Nicoma Bloodstock. “They want to see how horses live, how they are cared for each day.”

Bell, who participated on a panel discussing growth opportunities for the industry at the two-day conference, is the board president of Horse Country Inc., a not-for-profit organization that provides tours of Central Kentucky Thoroughbred farms.

KEEP works to promote horse industry awareness in Kentucky.

Bell noted that the original economic engine for horse racing, pari-mutuel wagering, faces more and more competition. He said it’s important for the industry to create new experiences for customers. He said the thing that makes racing unique compared with other gaming is the horse, and providing access to horses at tracks and farms can create unique experiences that will create new fans.

“Our consumer has changed a lot in my lifetime. Now that you can bet on anything, people want an experience. They want to touch a horse, they want a nice place to go for the races,” Bell said. “The horse is the differentiator… Demands of the horse racing consumer have dramatically changed from a sort of betting commodity to an experience. We need to drive more experience-based exposure to the horse for people.”

Bell said it’s hugely important to fans that the horse is treated well during its racing career and will be treated well after it’s retired. Bell said bringing people into contact with horses and allowing them to see first-hand how well they are treated can help when animal rights groups assail the sport.

“I believe in promoting transparency and promoting horses. The more you bring people into your barns, it helps affect the conversation,” Bell said. “Through social media, initiatives like Horse Country that celebrate the horse, its care, and its love; it can help change the conversation.”

Kentucky commissioner of agriculture Ryan Quarles, also participating on the panel, said strides have been made in educating legislators about the breeding industry. He said more of them understand that the backbone of the industry are family-owned farms. But he encouraged farm owners to continue to reach out to lawmakers and invite them to see the operations first-hand.

Quarles, a Republican who was elected in November 2015, said he is committed to working with the equine industry.

“Over the years Agriculture has had a limited relationship with the equine industry,” Quarles said. “I want to change that. I believe we need a more active role. You are going to have to educate me and the Department of Agriculture, because of that limited previous interaction.”

Four-Win Saturday Gives Louisiana Native Lanerie Lead In Keeneland Jockey Standings

 

 Corey Lanerie
Corey Lanerie
 

Jockey Corey Lanerie won with half of his eight mounts on Keeneland’s Saturday card, taking over the lead in the local jockey standings with a total of 14 wins. With just four racing days remaining, Lanerie has a one-win lead over both Javier Castellano and Luis Saez, both of whom were absent on Saturday.

Lanerie won his first leading rider title at Keeneland last fall with 25 wins over the course of the meet. Castellano captured the leading rider title for last year’s Spring meeting with 21 victories.

The wins began in the first race on Saturday for Lanerie, when he piloted Cheray to a one-length starter allowance victory for trainer Mark Cristel. His next win came in the fifth race, booting home Mike Maker’s Try Your Luck to a 9 1/4-length maiden special weight victory. He captured back-to-back events to close out the day, winning the seventh aboard Scooter Dickey’s Shadow Rock and the eighth on Charlie LoPresti’s Dear Elaine.

Castellano spent Saturday riding at Charles Town Race Course in West Virginia, where he won two races including the Charles Town Classic aboard Stanford. He is scheduled to return to Keeneland for racing on Sunday. Saez, who got off to a smoking-hot start at the Keeneland Spring meeting with seven wins over the first three days, has been riding in New York since Wednesday, and captured three races, including two stakes, on Saturday’s card at Aqueduct.

 

 

From 

 

THOROUGHBRED CHARITIES OF AMERICA ANNOUNCES JUNE AWARD OF MERIT WINNERS

LEXINGTON, Ky. � Thoroughbred Charities of America has announced the recipients of its Award of Merit honored at breeders associations� awards ceremonies in June.

Launched in January, in celebration of its 25th anniversary, nearly 20 recipients will be honored throughout the year. Recipients are nominated by the leadership of various state Thoroughbred owners and breeders associations.

The Louisiana Horse Rescue Association was honored at the Louisiana Thoroughbred Breeders Association�s Awards Banquet on June 6 and LoneStar Outreach to Place Ex-Racers (LOPE) was named the Award of Merit recipient at the Texas Thoroughbred Association�s Awards Banquet on June 20.

The Louisiana Horse Rescue Association (LAHRA) is a nonprofit organization that aims to rescue, rehome and retrain Thoroughbred racehorses. The organization is staffed exclusively by volunteers and has recently been involved in two large scale horse rescues in Louisiana.  Since their inception in 2010, LAHRA has assisted over 200 Thoroughbreds.

LoneStar Outreach to Place Ex-Racers (LOPE) is a nonprofit organization that works to help Texas racehorses thorough rehabilitation, retaining and rehoming services. LOPE employs a very extensive retraining program thus ensuring a strong foundation for their horses� futures in a new discipline. LOPE�s president, Lynn Reardon, has also produced a horsemanship DVD, offers horsemanship clinics and authored �Beyond the Homestretch�. LOPE has assisted well over 1,000 Thoroughbreds.

Award of Merit nominees consist of individuals or organizations working to provide a better life for Thoroughbreds or the people who work with them, either on the backstretch or on the farm.  Both achievements are reflective of TCA�s all encompassing mission to help Thoroughbreds and the people who care for them.

Other recipients honored earlier this year include Kip Elser, Elizabeth MacDonald, Russ Rhone, Bowman Second Chance Thoroughbred Adoption, Emerald Downs� the Prodigious Fund, Amy Tarrant, Akindale Thoroughbred Rescue, Dennis Miller, Hope After Racing (H.A.R.T.), Anne Tucker, Midwest Thoroughbreds, Steuart Pittman and the Retired Racehorse Project and Turning for Home.

Subsequent award winners will be announced monthly.

TCA was formed in 1990 to raise and distribute funds for charities in the Thoroughbred industry which provide a better life for Thoroughbreds both during and after their racing careers by supporting retirement, rescue, research and by helping the people who work with them. Over the last 25 years TCA has distributed over $21 million in grants to more than 200 Thoroughbred-related organizations. TCA is the charitable arm of the Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders Association (TOBA).