Texas Juvenile Sale Posts Increased Gross, Average Nearly Steady

(Austin, Texas – April 10, 2018) — Tuesday’s Texas 2-Year-Olds in Training Sale on the grounds of Lone Star Park concluded with a sizable increase in gross sales and a slight decrease in average compared to last year’s smaller catalogue. A total of 106 horses went through the ring at the sale operated by the Texas Thoroughbred Association in partnership with Lone Star Park and 84 horses found new homes. Last year’s auction included 93 head with 70 selling.

Gross sales this year totaled $2,161,900, up 15.4% from last year’s mark of $1,873,900. This year’s average was $25,737, down 3.9% from last year’s $26,770, and the median slipped 18.2% from $16,000 to $13,100. Buybacks this year came in at 20.8% compared to 24.7% last year.   

“I was really pleased that we attracted a larger catalogue this year after last year’s successful sale, and it was great to see the average almost the same with a nice increase in the gross,” said Tim Boyce, sales director. “We had four horses sell for more than $100,000 with a Texas-bred, Louisiana-bred and two Kentucky-breds, so that shows the variety of quality offerings we had.”

A Louisiana-bred filly named Charlotte G by promising young Louisiana stallion Bind topped the sale with a $140,000 bid from Gary Simms, agent for M&M Racing. The April 30 foal was one of two horses to work the fastest time of :10.2 during Sunday’s under tack show at Lone Star. She is the first foal out of the unraced Summer Bird mare Promise Me G, whose family includes Grade 3-winning Texas-bred Promise Me Silver.

Three other horses cracked six figures, including a Texas-bred colt by Texas stallion Grasshopper who sold for $120,000 from Wolf Creek Farm, agent. Another purchase by Gary Simms, agent for M&M Racing, the colt is a full brother to multiple stakes winner Supermason, an earner of $331,985. He clocked an eighth-mile in :10.4.

Also selling for $120,000 was a filly by Uncle Mo who is a half sister to Grade 1 winner Romance is Diane and Grade 2 winner Romanceishope. Consigned by Inside Move Inc., agent, and purchased by Swan Equine Co., the Kentucky-bred worked :11.2 in the under tack show.

The other six-figure horse was a Kentucky-bred colt by Twirling Candy who sold for $110,000 to Susan Moulton from Twin Oaks Training Center, agent. The March foal covered an eighth-mile in :10.3 to tie for the second-fastest time.

Full results are available at www.ttasales.com.

Next up on the Texas sale calendar is the summer yearling sale on August 27.

Louisiana Bred Filly by Bind and a Munnings Colt Post Fastest Breezes for Texas Juvenile Sale

(April 8, 2018 – Austin, Texas) — A colt by Munnings and a filly by Bind both clocked a co-fastest eighth-mile in :10.2 during Sunday’s under tack show for the Texas 2-Year-Olds in Training Sale at Lone Star Park. The horses worked against a moderate headwind on a chilly day at the Dallas-Fort Worth area track in advance of the auction set for Tuesday at 12 noon Central.
“There were some impressive works today even if the times don’t fully reflect that,” said Tim Boyce, who manages the sale for the Texas Thoroughbred Association in partnership with Lone Star Park. “We had a good crowd on hand despite having temperatures in the 40s, and with a larger catalogue than we had last year we expect to see some new buyers on Tuesday. We’ve also upgraded our video services so that will be an enhancement that both buyers and consignors will see.”
Hip94_2018Texas2yo
Denis Blake photo

Hip 94, a Louisiana-bred daughter of Bind named Charlotte G, was the first to work :10.2. The April 30 foal from the consignment of Twin Oaks Training Center, agent, is the first foal out of an unraced Summer Bird mare from the family of Texas-bred graded stakes winner Promise Me Silver.

Hip 95, an unnamed Texas-bred colt by Munnings, equaled that time over the Lone Star surface. Also consigned by Twin Oaks Training Center, agent, the unnamed March 18 foal is out of the stakes-placed Seneca Jones mare Proudtobeajones, who has produced four winners including $94,365 earner Proud Player.

Hip95_2018Texas2yo
Mary Cage photo
Videos of the under tack show will be online this evening at www.ttasales.com, and live video of Tuesday’s sale will also be available on the website.
Click link below for a table of all breeze times

Catalogue for Texas Two-Year-Olds in Training Sale Continues to Grow

(Austin, TX – February 28, 2018) — A total of 126 head have been consigned for the Texas Two-Year-Olds in Training Sale on April 10starting at 12 noon at the Texas Thoroughbred Sale Pavilion at Lone Star Park. The under tack show is set for April 8 at 11:00 a.m. at the track located in the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex.

This catalogue represents a 20-percent increase in the number of head compared to last year, and the sale has also eclipsed itself with a considerably-improved quality in pedigrees. Such national sires as Blame, Congrats, Curlin, Flat Out, Gemologist, Into Mischief, Jimmy Creed, Kantharos, Kitten’s Joy, Munnings, Orb, Paynter, Point of Entry, Shanghai Bobby, Stay Thirsty, Street Boss, Street Sense, Tiznow, Twirling Candy and Uncle Mo give evidence that the sale has surged upward after the solid performance of last year’s auction. Cairo’s Prince and Will Take Charge lead a list of first-year sires that includes Can the Man, Cross Traffic, Goldencents, Moro Tap, Shakin It Up and Sum of the Parts. Leading the regional sire contingent is Texas’ leading sire Too Much Bling, with solid company from Closing Argument, Euroears, Grasshopper, Half Ours, Intimidator, My Golden Song and Special Rate.

The sale again features a unique interactive online catalogue where consignors can post photos and videos as well as the pedigrees of their sale horses for buyer perusal prior to the gallop show. This year the gallop show is being filmed by the Ocala, Florida-based group Dillon Video and Photo and is expected to be online shortly after the gallop show on April 8. 

“I am very excited about this year’s sale,” commented Sale Director Tim Boyce. “Along with the solid increase in numbers and quality, I look forward to working with the Dillon crew for the production of our under tack show. This is something the market has wanted, and I am glad we are able to give it.”

The cover of this year’s catalogue features the 2017 winners of both divisions of the Texas Thoroughbred Futurity at Lone Star Park, Carl Moore and Brad Grady’s Galactica and Susan Moulton’s Janae. Both horses went through the ring at last year’s two-year-old sale and gave early returns to their owners. The two divisions of the race this summer are estimated to have purses of $100,000 apiece.

This will mark the third juvenile sale held by the Texas Thoroughbred Association in partnership with Lone Star Park. The 2016 auction featured 85 head, and the catalogue grew to 105 head last year.  

“It’s very gratifying to see that we’ve been able to attract about 20 more head each year,” said TTA Executive Director Mary Ruyle. “Our goal was to re-establish a viable marketplace for consignors and buyers from around the Southwest, and the increased catalogue size each year shows that we are on the way to doing that.”

Catalogues will be mailed out the first week of March. The sale can now be viewed on the TTA Sales website at www.ttasales.com as well on the Equineline Sales Catalogue app.

Lone Star Announces 2018 Purse Increase Of Up To 25 Percent On Overnight Races

Lone Star Park has announced an increase in overnight race purses for the 2018 Thoroughbred season which opens April 19. All overnight races will see an increase of $2,000 each in purse money. Some overnight race categories will see as much as a 25% gain in their purses. No race throughout the 44-day season will have less than $10,000 in purse money offered.

This is the most significant increase to Thoroughbred purses in a decade. Track officials cited handle gains in all three categories (on-track live, off-track and simulcasting) as the major source of funding for the purse increase. And with a few less race days this year the track was able to share the monies that would have been allocated to those races.

“We are proud to offer our horsemen the benefit of this increase,” said Bart Lang, Lone Star Park’s Director of Racing. “We offer the longest race meeting with the most race days and the best overnight purses in the state. Our goal this spring is to build on the gains in handle we saw last year during our Thoroughbred season.”

The stable area opens on Monday, March 19. The track will open for training on Wednesday, March 21. Official workouts will begin on Monday, March 26.

Lone Star Park looks forward to welcoming horsemen for our 2018 Thoroughbred Racing Season which runs through Sunday, July 22.

Texas Thoroughbred Association Sets 2018 Sale Dates

The Texas Thoroughbred Association, in partnership with Lone Star Park, has announced its sales dates for 2018.

The Texas 2-Year-Olds in Training Sale will be held April 10 with the under tack show set for April 8. Horses will breeze over the Lone Star Park track, and the sale will be held at the Texas Thoroughbred Sales Pavilion on the backside.

The entry deadline for the 2-year-old sale is January 15, and all sale graduates will be eligible for nomination to the 2018 Texas Thoroughbred Sales Futurity to be run at Lone Star with two divisions and an estimated purse of $100,000 apiece.

The Texas Summer Yearling Sale has been scheduled for August 27, also at Lone Star.

This will mark the third year for the Texas sales under the operation of TTA and Lone Star Park after taking over for Fasig-Tipton. This year’s 2-year-olds in training sale posted an average of $26,770 and gross sales of $1.874 million, compared to an $18,515 average and $981,300 in gross sales a year earlier.

“We have seen tremendous growth in the 2-year-old sale this year, as I think buyers and consignors from around the Southwest region responded to the stability we have brought to the auction market here,” said Tim Boyce, sales director. “I know quite a few buyers who found some nice pinhooking prospects at our yearling sale, so we expect to see some of those horses again.”

When The Storm Clears, Veterinary Challenges Remain For Horses Stuck In Flood Waters

by | 09.12.2017 |

 

Hurricanes Harvey and Irma flooded two of the largest horse populations in the United States. Texas has a million horses and Florida has a half-million. During the hurricanes, the major threat to these animals was flying debris, but in their aftermath, horses struggled through floodwater to survive.

Floodwater is particularly hazardous because of the level of pollutants it carries. Not only does it harbor bacteria from sewage and other sources, but it also contains harmful chemicals from flooded industrial facilities and breached storage areas on farms.

“I’ve been through a lot of floods,” said Dr. William Moyer, who in 2015 retired from Texas A&M University after a 22-year career as a professor and head of the Large Animal Clinical Sciences Department. He still helps out as a member of TAMU’s Veterinary Emergency Team, which he helped establish during Hurricane Rita in 2005. The unit is the largest and most sophisticated veterinary medical disaster-response team in the country.

Moyer said skin problems are common in horses standing in floodwater. Water leaches natural oils and other protective factors from the skin, making it easier for pollutants to invade. Usually these horses don’t suffer from a specific skin disease with a name, he said, but from exposure to a variety of irritants, chemicals, and bacteria that can have a deleterious effect, depending on the concentration.

“If you look at some of these refineries, there are cattle or horses grazing on the other side of the fence,” he said. “But with the exception of one chemical plant incident during Harvey, I don’t think there have been any toxic spills.”

Moyer said the most important thing is to get the horse somewhere it can dry off and examine it closely to find and treat any open wounds, even small ones. He said to pay particular attention to the pasterns and the backside of the fetlocks, where the feather might hide a wound.

“You might see a little cut that you normally wouldn’t even treat,” he said. “But then two days later the leg is blown up all the way up to the horse’s chest because the contamination is such that just a nick potentially becomes a significant problem.

“Clean it up with soap and water or some kind of effective disinfectant,” he said.

Clean water in disaster areas usually is scarce, but if a safe water supply via a hose is available, Moyer said to bathe the horse in mild detergent, such as Dawn dish soap, to wash off contamination from the floodwater.

If possible, horsemen should try to find out the status of the tetanus vaccination of any horse pulled from floodwater and boost it, if needed.

Hoof wounds

Dick Fanguy is a former president of the American Farrier’s Association who lives near Baton Rouge, La. Though his area was spared from flooding this time around, he took care of many horses during Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, triaging their foot wounds and passing them on to veterinary students for further care.

“These horses are going to come out of that water and their feet are going to be extremely soft,” he said.

Soft hooves are more easily penetrated when they step on foreign objects. The hazards depend on the area where a horse is found. In urban areas, debris from damaged buildings is under the water, whereas horses in rural areas will be exposed to fewer hazards.

“I pulled so many foreign objects out of soles that it was ridiculous,” Fanguy said. “We rescued two horses from New Orleans, and I pulled roofing nails and glass out of their feet. But horses that were in a rural setting just came in with wet, soaked feet. It was just a matter of putting them in a dry stall and letting nature do what nature does.”

Puncture wounds were the priority because of the danger from pollution in the floodwater. For these, Fanguy immediately disinfected the wound with a surgical scrub, debrided it, packed it with a mixture of Epsom salt and povidone iodine (Betadine), and wrapped the foot.

“My experience is that a hoof is a very resilient thing and will come out all right,” he said.

One of the tragedies in the wake of disasters is that many horses (and other animals) are never reunited with their owners because they bear no identification. Moyer, a strong proponent of microchipping, hopes these hurricanes will be a wake-up call for owners to have their animals microchipped.

Louisiana requires all horses to be microchipped. In the aftermath of Katrina and Rita, all but one of 364 recovered horses were able to be reunited with their owners using microchip identification.

NTRA Charities Donates to Harvey Relief Efforts

NTRA Charities—a subsidiary of the National Thoroughbred Racing Association—has pledged a $5,000 donation to the Penn National Gaming Foundation, with the contribution earmarked for employees of Sam Houston Race Park most severely impacted by Hurricane Harvey and the resulting floods in Southeast Texas.

“We’ve all seen the devastating images coming out of South Texas,” said NTRA President & CEO Alex Waldrop. “The region is hurting, including individuals and their families directly tied to Sam Houston Race Park. We are pleased to contribute funds to support these families in their time of need and applaud so many other horse industry groups making similar contributions across the region.”

Sam Houston, currently between race meetings, opened its stable area as a horse shelter during Harvey and the racetrack property, in northwest Houston, appears to have evaded serious damage. However, track president Andrea Young said they have been in contact with at least a dozen employees who have been severely impacted.

“We are incredibly grateful for the generosity of NTRA charities,” Young said. “There are so many people in the Greater Houston area that have been impacted by Hurricane Harvey and it is comforting for our employees to see the support of the racing community during this difficult time. This gift will go directly to our employees who have been most impacted. The road to recovery is just beginning and this wonderful gesture will help that recovery start today.”

The Penn National Gaming Foundation, a private 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, is establishing a Hurricane Harvey disaster relief project to provide financial assistance for the immediate needs of Sam Houston Race Park employees and support nonprofit organizations in the Greater Houston area. If you would like to make a donation to the Foundation or request additional information on its efforts, please contact Amanda Garber at (610) 373-2400 or amanda.garber@pngaming.com.

Sam Houston opened in 1994 as the first Class 1 racetrack in Texas. Penn National Gaming (PNG) is the managing member of Sam Houston Race Park and also operates Thoroughbred racing at Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races, Hollywood Gaming at Mahoning Valley Race Course, Hollywood Casino at Penn National Race Course, and Zia Park Casino, Hotel & Racetrack. PNG owns, operates or has ownership interests in gaming and racing facilities and video gaming terminal operations at 29 properties in 17 jurisdictions.

Sam Houston Shelters Horses Displaced by Texas Flood

More than 100 horses being stabled as of Aug. 29.

 

So far the Texas Thoroughbred industry appears to have escaped the worst of Hurricane Harvey, which battered the Gulf Coast with damaging winds when it made landfall Aug. 25 and has since saturated the Houston area with a record 49 inches of contiguous rain.

Sam Houston Race Park, which is located northwest of downtown Houston and adjacent to the Sam Houston Tollway, has not sustained any major damage or flooding, according to Roland Tamez, who is with the track’s security team. The track did not have any racehorses on the grounds when the storm hit because its live racing season ended in May.

The barn area is now being used to provide free shelter for horses being evacuated out of flooded areas. Several horses had been sent to the track ahead of the storm because their owners had experienced flooding in the past.

“We’ve got over 100 horses in three barns right now,” said Tamez, who added that anyone who needs shelter for their horses can call the track at (281) 807-8790 and arrange for a security officer to assist.

“These stalls do not have gates,” Tamez said. “So horse owners need to provide a gate or stall webbing, hay, feed, bedding, tubs, and buckets. The track is providing water.”

Tamez said the roads around the racetrack are clear, and he noted there is no flooding along the nearby segment of the tollway and the feeder roads. He said roads also are clear between the racetrack and I-45.

Sam Houston president Andrea Young said the barn area will be available as long as necessary.

“There are areas that may take three weeks to a month before people can get back into their homes, because that’s how long it will take for the water to go down,” Young said. “We’re prepared to help as long as we need to.”

Heavy rains much farther inland did effect the Gillespie County Fairgrounds, which had to cancel live racing this weekend at its track near Fredericksburg and will conduct three of its Quarter Horse stakes races at Retama Park in San Antonio, which is about 70 miles away. No damage was done to the facility, but state stewards determined the saturated racing surface was unsafe.

Aside from the horses being sheltered at Sam Houston, the Texas Thoroughbred Association has not fielded many calls for assistance over the past few days, according to TTA executive director Mary Ruyle.

“We are compiling and will publish a list of resources,” Ruyle said. “But it is surprising we haven’t heard more.”

One reason, she said, may be because a majority of the farms are located inland from the hardest hit areas. James Leatherman, racing secretary at Retama, said the racetrack only got two inches of rain with winds of 45-50 mph, which caused only minor damage to some fencing.

In Louisiana, the Equine Sales Company has announced that its Consignor Select Yearling Sale set for Aug. 31 in Opelousas, will be held as scheduled starting at 10 a.m. local time. The sales facility and the surrounding area have not been significantly affected by Hurricane Harvey.

Equine organizations offer disaster relief funds to Help Those Affected by Hurricane Harvey

(Washington, DC)- In the wake of one of the worst tropical natural disasters to hit the United States, the residents and animals of Texas need your help. A record 49 inches of rain has fallen in the Houston area, and even more is expected. So what can you do?

There are several equine specific disaster relief funds that you can donate to that will support the efforts of emergency response groups and organizations that are helping horses impacted by the flooding.

  • United States Equestrian Federation Equine Disaster Relief Fund: Developed in 2005 during the aftermath of Hurricanes Rita and Katrina, the USEF Equine Disaster Relief Fund was formed to help ensure the safety and well-being of horses during trying times. Since its inception, over $370,000 has been donated to aid horses across all breeds in disaster-related situations. All money donated to the fund is strictly used to benefit horses and horse owners, and the USEF will be working with the Houston SPCA to help animals that have been displaced. To donate to the USEF Disaster Relief Fund:  https://www.usef.org/donate
  • American Association of Equine Practitioners Foundation Equine Disaster Relief Fund: The AAEP Foundation will work with agencies and veterinary members in Texas, Louisiana and other affected states to identify the needs of the equine community. Supplies are not being accepted currently as the catastrophic storm is still occurring. Once the Foundation receives an assessment of need and distribution protocols from the agencies and veterinary members in the afflicted areas, the Foundation will work to support them with supply needs as well. To support the impending needs of these equine victims, please donate online at:  https://foundation.aaep.org/form/foundation-donation.  If you wish to offer assistance with supplies or other resources, please email Keith Kleine at kkleine@aaep.org and you will be contacted with further instructions.
  • Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International Disaster Relief Fund: The fund helps centers in need due to catastrophic disasters not normally covered by operating insurance. This includes flooding. The fund was started in 2005 to help centers with the damage inflicted by Hurricane Katrina. To donate, click here:  Donate to the PATH Intl. Disaster Relief Fund.  Additionally,  if your PATH Intl. Center needs disaster relief,  click here for information and to download the Disaster Relief Fund application.

Additionally, Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner has established the Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund that will accept tax deductible flood relief donations and will be administered by the Greater Houston Community Foundation.

Please share with your fellow members of the horse community, and with anyone wanting to help all those in need!

View on AHC Website

Hurricane Harvey: USEF Equine Disaster Relief Fund Supports Houston Emergency Response Groups

Sweeping across the Gulf Coast of Texas as a Category 4 hurricane over the past weekend, Hurricane Harvey’s catastrophic flooding has put the Houston and surrounding area equine community in a state of distress. Declared a major disaster and weather event, hundreds of horses and livestock have been affected.

Banding together as a community, emergency rescues, fellow equestrians opening up their barns for shelter and extensive veterinary care has been required over the last several days.  As the rain continues to fall, rising flood waters will make extended care for displaced large and small animals on an ongoing need.

Supporting the efforts of emergency response groups and organizations that are helping horses impacted by the flooding, US Equestrian is providing financial assistance through the USEF Equine Disaster Relief Fund.

Developed in 2005 during the aftermath of Hurricanes Rita and Katrina, the USEF Equine Disaster Relief Fund was formed to help ensure the safety and well-being of horses during trying times. Since its inception, over $370,000 has been donated  to aid horses across all breeds in disaster-related situations. All money donated to the fund is strictly used to benefit horses and horse owners.

Make a donation to the USEF Disaster Relief Fund here.

US Equestrian will be working with the Houston SPCA to support their rescue and rehabilitation efforts through the USEF Equine Disaster Relief Fund.

Encouraging donations to help the horses affected by Hurricane Harvey, US Equestrian CEO Bill Moroney said, “as part of our commitment to the health, welfare, and safety of horses, the USEF disaster relief fund was created to assist horses impacted by devastating natural disasters such as Hurricane Harvey. The outreach and generosity of the equestrian community to support the ongoing emergency assistance in this and future disasters allows us to provide direct financial assistance to the groups involved in the ongoing rescue efforts.”

For more information on the USEF Equine Disaster Relief Fund, please contact Vicki Lowell, vlowell@usef.org.