LSU Student Among Thirty-Three Veterinary Students Rewarded for Leadership, Commitment to Equine Medicine

Thirty-three veterinary students preparing for a career in equine medicine have received a combined $102,000 in financial support through the 2017 Winner’s Circle Scholarship Program, co-sponsored by the American Association of Equine Practitioners’ (AAEP) Foundation, Platinum Performance and The Race For Education.

The Winner’s Circle scholarships, managed by The Race For Education, are intended to help ease the financial burden of a veterinary education by offering third- and fourth-year students at each of the AAEP’s 39 full or full-affiliate student chapters an opportunity to earn scholarships ranging from $1,500 to $5,000, depending on the needs of the individual student. Students are selected for scholarships based on their leadership roles and dedication to a future in equine healthcare.

Since its establishment in 2008, the Winner’s Circle Scholarship Program has provided nearly $1.5 million in scholarships to 315 veterinary students.

“The rising cost of veterinary school continues to present challenges to talented students who endeavor to enter the equine veterinary profession,” said Richard Mitchell, DVM, MRCVS, DACVSMR, chairman of the AAEP Foundation Advisory Council. “We are grateful to all of our donors and especially thank our partners The Race For Education and Platinum Performance for all their long-time support.”

In 2017, 18 students received $1,500 scholarships; 15 others received $5,000 scholarships— which includes $4,000 in scholarship funds from The Race For Education’s Assets for Independence Program—a federal grant program in partnership with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Administration For Children and Families. Only U.S. students attending veterinary school in the U.S. were eligible for awards through the federal matching grant. An additional 19 applicants not selected for Winner’s Circle scholarships are also eligible to received $4,000 awards through the Race For Education’s Assets For Independence Program.

 

Congratulations to the following 2017 recipients:

Sarah Appleby, University of Wisconsin

Renee Baumann, Oregon State University

Ana Caruso, Texas A&M University

Amanda Craven, University of Wisconsin

Chloe Evetts, University of Florida

Esther Farber, North Carolina State University

Christina Frost, Washington State University

Devin Gardner, University of Missouri

Melanie Harness, University of Guelph

Olivia Hegedus, Ohio State University

Zachary Hulbert, Auburn University

Katherine Larson, Mississippi State University

Michala Lindley, Washington State University

Caitlin Malik, Louisiana State University

Amy McBirney, University of California Davis

Mariah Melin, University of Minnesota

Logan Metzen, Iowa State University

Allison Mustonen, Purdue University

Haley O’Connell, Ross University

Kirstie Oswald, University of Saskatchewan

Callayn  Paul, Michigan State University

Jenetta Porter, Iowa State University

Jessica Quigley, Tuskegee University

Shelbe Rice, University of Georgia

Kaitlyn Rigby, Kansas State University

Rachel Roberson, Auburn University

Allison Salinger, Western University of Health Sciences

Madison Skelton, Midwestern University

Jason Smith, Virginia-Maryland College

Kelsey Stoner, Washington State University

Cally Webster, Ohio State University

Hanum Wensil-Strow, University of Pennsylvania

Emma Winstead, Tufts University

 

About AAEP Foundation

The AAEP Foundation, a 501(c)(3) organization created in 1994, serves as the charitable arm of the American Association of Equine Practitioners to improve the welfare of the horse. Since its inception, the Foundation has disbursed more than $3.7 million to support its mission. For more information, visit www.aaepfoundation.org.

 

About The Race For Education

Since its’ inception in 2002, The Race For Education has delivered more than $6 million in scholarships and educational programs. Through academic development programs, tutoring, internships, financial literacy training and scholarships; The Race for Education provides opportunities for educational success for young people with significant financial need and academic challenges. The ultimate goal is to ensure our young people become successful in life and assets to their community. For additional information about The Race for Education, visit www.raceforeducation.org.

 

About Platinum Performance

Platinum Performance® believes in the power of nutrition and supplementation, and remains committed to providing formulas that produce superior results in the horse. Over the past several decades, Platinum has continued to research the role of nutrition with regards to wellness and performance and is committed to providing equine veterinarians, horse owners and trainers the nutritional tools they need to benefit from cutting edge equine nutrition. Horse Health is the Platinum Performance Mission and we look forward to helping you NOURISH YOUR PASSION. Find more at www.platinumperformance.com.

Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory Announces Free App

The Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory (TVMDL), is pleased to announce our free mobile app is available to download for both Android (Play Store) and iOS (Apple iTunes store) devices.
The TVMDL mobile app gives you the ability to search for diagnostic tests and get laboratory information.
Test information includes:
– A detailed description of the test.
– Specimens needed for testing.
– How to package and ship specimens safely.
– Pricing information.
– Test schedules and expected turnaround times.
Laboratory information includes:
– Link to driving directions to all four locations.
– TVMDL contact information.
– Billing and physical addresses for sending specimens.
– Hours of operation.
Coming soon – retrieval of test result reports

AAEP Announces 2017 Education Opportunities for Equine Veterinarians and Students

Equine practitioners can invest in practical veterinary knowledge in diverse areas of equine medicine through a slate of continuing education events in 2017, sponsored by the American Association of Equine Practitioners.

The schedule includes two Focus meetings, which present the latest evidence-based knowledge within a specific area of medicine; a 360° meeting that combines lectures and wet labs into an intensive “boot camp” experience; and the 63rd Annual Convention in San Antonio, Texas.

360° Diagnosing, Imaging and Treating the Hind Suspensory and Stifle: Everything You Need or Want to Know: July 9-12 at Colorado State University in Fort Collins, Colo. Meeting sponsors are Boehringer Ingelheim, Dechra Veterinary Products and Sound

In sport horses, hind suspensory and stifle injuries are common but often underdiagnosed. At the AAEP’s 360° Diagnosing, Imaging and Treating the Hind Suspensory and Stifle, you’ll go from “how to” to “can do” with interactive, small-group training that employs a holistic approach to identifying and resolving lameness in these areas.

 

Focus on Colic/Focus on DentistryJuly 16-18 at the Hyatt Regency in Lexington, Ky. Sponsorship provided by Arenus and KEMIN, platinum level sponsors.

Increase your knowledge and ability to diagnose and manage the No.1 killer of horses at AAEP’s Focus on Colic. This meeting is a three-day exploration into the latest evidence-based knowledge to enable practitioners to assess abdominal pain, employ appropriate techniques and manage the condition medically and surgically.

Focus on Dentistry is an in-depth look at equine dental care—providing practitioners the means to perform a thorough oral exam, recognize oral pathologies, develop treatment plans, perform routine dental care and be introduced to advanced dental therapies.

Focus on Dentistry and Focus on Colic will be held jointly, allowing registrants to attend sessions of both meetings for one registration fee.  

 

Focus on StudentsJuly 15-18 at the Hyatt Regency in Lexington, Ky. Sponsorship provided by Arenus and KEMIN, platinum level sponsors.

Future horse doctors will gain hands on experience through clinical dry labs combined with professional development and career networking. Students will also attend sessions of Focus on Colic and Focus on Dentistry.

 

63rd Annual Convention: Nov. 17-21 at the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center in San Antonio, Texas

Anchored by more than 100 hours of CE, the world’s largest education event for equine veterinarians returns to the always-popular city of San Antonio to deliver the latest clinical knowledge in veterinary medicine.

 

To view the complete program for the 360° and Focus meetings or to register, visit https://aaep.org/meetings. The program and registration for the annual convention will be available this summer.

 

The American Association of Equine Practitioners, headquartered in Lexington, Ky., was founded in 1954 as a non-profit organization dedicated to the health and welfare of the horse. Currently, AAEP reaches more than 5 million horse owners through its over 9,000 members worldwide and is actively involved in ethics issues, practice management, research and continuing education in the equine veterinary profession and horse industry.

 

Think Before You Reach for an NSAID for Your Horse

Why You Should Consider Reaching Out to Your Veterinarian Before Reaching for an NSAID.
Equine lameness seems to happen at the most inopportune times, and it’s one of the main reasons for removing a horse from athletic activity. When lameness appears, horse owners are often quick to reach for a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). In fact, a survey found 82 percent of horse owners use NSAIDs without consulting their veterinarian.1 But that may not be the smart move.

“It’s important for horse owners to consult their veterinarian before giving an NSAID,” says Hoyt Cheramie, DVM, MS, Senior Manager, Merial Large Animal Veterinary Services. “The best option – and the shortest path back to soundness – may be a medication, treatment or protocol the horse owner hasn’t considered.”

“In addition, no medication is without risks,” says Cheramie. “Your veterinarian is the best person to help you monitor your horse’s health for potential side effects or lack of efficacy. Keeping your veterinarian involved, even if it’s just informing them of your treatment decision, will provide them with important information in the future if the issue comes up again.”

Your equine veterinarian considers many factors before prescribing any treatment, including an NSAID:

  • What is the horse’s history?
  • Is the diagnosis a simple lameness or could it be something else?
  • What treatment options are available?
  • What is the horse owner’s budget and resources?

If your veterinarian does recommend an NSAID, they’ll take into consideration:

  • Has this horse been given this medication before?
  • What dosage should the horse receive, and what is the best route of administration?
  • What are the potential side effects of the treatment or medication?

The decision-making process can be complex, which is why most equine NSAIDs are available only with a prescription. If for some reason your horse does have a reaction or fails to improve, ensuring your veterinarian is fully aware of the situation will be a benefit.

Regardless of discipline, when your horse is lame, it can impact not only your short-term competitive goals but also your horse’s long-term health. So, before you reach for that old tube or bottle, talk to your veterinarian about all of your options to help effectively manage lameness, pain and inflammation in your horse.

1Andrews F, McConnico R. Cause for concern: Evidence that therapeutic dosing of nonselective NSAIDs contributes to gastrointestinal injury. Equine Vet Education. 2009;21(12):663-664.

AAEP Foundation Announces Funding of Research into Laminitis

The American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP) Foundation has announced financial support for two research projects investigating support limb laminitis, in which lameness in one limb results in laminitis in the opposite limb. Subsequent separation of the coffin bone from the hoof wall causes pain and eventually displacement, either coffin bone rotation or sinking, in the foot.

AAEP members have identified laminitis as the most important equine disease requiring research. Support limb laminitis was the type of laminitis 2006 Kentucky Derby winner Barbaro succumbed to while healing from a severe fracture in a hind limb.

In one study, Hana Galantino-Homer, VMD, Ph.D., Dipl. ACT, at the University of Pennsylvania will investigate the alterations that occur in the protein structure that supports the bone to the hoof connection. Foot specimens from horses affected by support limb laminitis will be used to study how nutrient deprivation and subsequent production of abnormal proteins (keratins) affect the support structures within the hoof. The goal is to understand the process of cell pathology in the foot to better predict, diagnose and treat support limb laminitis.

The second study, led by Samantha Brooks, Ph.D., at the University of Florida, seeks to understand the response of the cells in the support structures within the hoof. By utilizing RNA sequencing, genes that respond to the abnormal support in the foot will be identified and compared to normal feet. Understanding the gene upregulation will help identify the process within the hoof that leads to support failure. The research will use real-time PCR to identify the production of inflammatory mediators and enzymes involved with the pathology.

“The generosity of many enabled us to fund these projects that will advance the knowledge and help unravel the mysteries surrounding this insidious disease,” said Jeff Berk, VMD, chairman of the AAEP Foundation Advisory Council. “We are particularly grateful to Starlight Racing partners, whose matching funds challenge in 2014 in memory of its Grade II winner Intense Holiday raised awareness and much-needed funds for the fight.”

Both studies will utilize the Laminitis Discovery Database at the University of Pennsylvania, which has specimens from horses that succumbed to support limb laminitis and from normal horses. The database includes a wealth of information about the affected horses.

For more information about the AAEP Foundation, visit http://www.aaepfoundation.org.

The AAEP Foundation, a 501(c)(3) organization created in 1994, serves as the charitable arm of the American Association of Equine Practitioners to improve the welfare of the horse. Since its inception, the Foundation has disbursed more than $3.7 million to support its mission.

How to Protect Your Horse from West Nile Virus Infection

By Kristen Browning-Blas
Colorado State University College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences

Late summer is peak transmission season for West Nile Virus, and confirmed cases are rising among horses in many regions.
Veterinarians and public health experts urge owners to protect their horses by reducing mosquito populations and possible breeding areas. Equine veterinarians at Colorado State University’s James L. Voss Veterinary Teaching Hospital say two important methods will help protect horses against West Nile Virus infection: reduce exposure to mosquitoes and vaccinate against the virus.

Reduce exposure to mosquitoes
• When possible, stall horses during peak mosquito activity, at dawn and dusk.
• Eliminate areas of standing or stagnant water on property, dispose of discarded tires, and change birdbath water and water in tanks for horses at least weekly.
• Use fans on horses while stabled.
• Use insect repellants designed for horses. A fly sheet and fly mask will minimize your horse’s exposure to mosquitoes.
• Use incandescent bulbs around the perimeter of the stable.
• Remove any dead birds found on the property, as birds are part of the virus cycle. To pick up a bird, use rubber gloves or a plastic bag turned inside out. For information on testing of birds for West Nile Virus, contact your public health office.

Vaccinations for West Nile Virus
There are currently four licensed vaccine formulations available for use in horses based on efficacy and safety studies for protection against West Nile Virus. “West Nile is one of our core vaccines, so most people vaccinate here,” said Dr. Luke Bass, a veterinarian with CSU’s Equine Field Service. The American Association of Equine Practitioners recognizes the West Nile Virus vaccine as a core vaccination for all horses regardless of geographic location.
Though the West Nile Virus vaccine is commonly used in horses, vaccination is just one part of the preventive strategy; methods to reduce mosquito exposure should be employed at the same time. Vaccination against other causes of equine encephalitis (eastern equine encephalitis, western equine encephalitis, and Venezuelan equine encephalitis) does not protect your horse against West Nile Virus.
The initial West Nile vaccination or booster vaccine must be given prior to exposure to the virus and your horse should be vaccinated well in advance of mosquito season. Consult with your veterinarian to determine the best vaccination protocol for your horse depending on previous vaccination history and virus and mosquito activity.

Vaccinations for the pregnant mare
It is important to consult your veterinarian to determine the best method of protection against West Nile Virus for broodmares. Several of the West Nile vaccines have been given to pregnant mares without observed adverse outcomes. As a general recommendation, reproductive specialists suggest avoiding vaccines of any kind in the first 40 days of pregnancy.

Diagnosis and treatment of West Nile Virus
Clinical signs of West Nile infection include fever, incoordination, muscle twitching, head pressing, hyper-excitability, anorexia, lethargy, recumbency (lying down), and death.
Diagnosis of West Nile Virus is made by noting the clinical signs and by positive diagnostic tests on blood or cerebrospinal fluid.
Treatment is primarily supportive, with anti-inflammatory drugs and fluids. Some horses may require hospitalization and assistance with a sling in order to remain standing. Products that provide antibodies to West Nile Virus are available, and the use of these products in equine cases should be discussed with your veterinarian.

Frequently asked questions:
Should I vaccinate my horse for West Nile Virus?

Yes, work with your veterinarian to determine the optimal plan for your horse.
Can I vaccinate my mare if she is in foal?
Yes, work with your veterinarian to determine the optimal plan for your mare.
How old should a foal be to receive the vaccine?
Recent research has shown that foals 3 months of age can be safely vaccinated against West Nile, and will subsequently build an immune response. If your foals are in a high-mosquito area, you may want to vaccinate them as early as 3 months for this disease.
Can a horse infected with West Nile Virus infect horses in neighboring stalls or infect me?
No, the virus is spread through the bite of an infected mosquito, not by contact with an ill horse.
Find current information on West Nile Virus here:
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
American Mosquito Control Association
American Association of Equine Practitioners

LSU School of Veterinary Medicine to Host Equi-Day

For Immediate Release: March 3, 2016
 
LSU School of Veterinary Medicine to host Equi-Day
BATON ROUGE, LA.—On Saturday, March 12, the LSU SVM Student Chapter of the American Association of Equine Practitioners (SCAAEP) will host Equi-Day from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine (LSU SVM). Equi-day is an event dedicated to providing educational opportunities to horse owners about equine medicine, as well as supporting SCAAEP. This event will be filled with numerous informative speakers, as well as demonstrations and lunch is provided.
 
The registration fee is $25, but goes up to $30 on the day of the event. This money will be used to support the SCAAEP, which includes wet labs for students to get hands-on experience with ultrasound, dentistry, bandaging, stallion management and more before they begin their hospital rotations. The lectures will be held from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the LSU SVM Auditorium and include lectures on horse nutrition, equine first aid and vaccinations, among other topics. The demonstrations will follow lunch and will be in various locations throughout the LSU Veterinary Hospital. Demonstrations include bandaging techniques, physical exams, acupuncture and dentistry.
 
To register or learn more about the lectures and demonstrations, visit www.equineclub.wix.com/equiday.
 
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