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Can Bandages Cause Tendon Damage In Racehorses?

by | 06.11.2018 | 1:19pm

Many racehorses have their legs bandaged in an effort to reduce the chance of overreaching and injury when they are worked or exercised; many sport horses and those ridden for pleasure have their legs bandaged or wrapped by owners who believe they are providing support to equine legs. In horses that are not racing, the chance of injury from interference is much lower as they are not working at racing speeds.

British veterinarian Dr. Campbell Thompson of Nantwich Equine Vets is urging horse owners and riders to carefully consider if their horses should wear leg support while being ridden. The former vet of the British Olympic team, Thompson warns that horses’ legs can overheat if the horse is worked hard or if the weather is hot. This overheating can make horses susceptible to tendon damage in the legs that are wrapped, he says.

While open-front boots, like those worn by horses that jump, are not potentially harmful, bandages that completely encase the horse’s legs, like those used on racehorses, can cause overheating and potential for injury, Thompson said. Additionally, he does not feel that any wraps provide support for the horse’s limbs.

Read more at Horse & Hound

Justify 13th Triple Crown Winner After Belmont Victory

Undefeated chestnut set the pace and held off multiple challengers.

 

The trio of tests is designed to expose chinks in otherwise strong armor, missteps in well-thought-out game plans, holes that even those closest to the horse going through the gauntlet didn’t even know were there.

It is the whole reason the five-week exercise that is the American Triple Crown remains the most heralded achievement in a sport that counts its age in centuries—because unlike any other challenge, it separates those who almost can from the select few who refuse to be denied.

Since the start of his career 112 days ago, Justify has been jumping through hoops that horses with his experience, or lack thereof, should never be able to handle. He went from maiden winner to grade 1 victor to classic hero in just over 70 days. He went into a quagmire two weeks after shoving history aside on the first Saturday in May and emerged more tested and hardened than ever. He arrived in New York to try his hand in a race that has flattened horses whose plaques hang in the Hall of Fame, while only serving as a coronation on 12 exceptional occasions.

And so it was in the 150th edition of the final leg of the Triple Crown that the son of Scat Daddy, already deemed a prodigy, became racing’s newest living legend. At the end of a five-week odyssey logic says should have taxed his chestnut frame to detrimental levels and highlighted the foundation that was poured in at an accelerated rate, he managed to redefine what those of his ilk can achieve.

Three years after a Bob Baffert-trained freak ran right on through the most heavily guarded club in racing, the velvet rope dropped once more for another prodigy from the barn of the man who himself keeps raising his own ceiling on greatness. Justify, the horse who didn’t make his first start until Feb. 18 and, thus, should have cracked under the strain that has undone many of an all-timer before him, captured the June 9 Belmont Stakes Presented by NYRA Bets (G1) by 1 3/4 lengths in gate-to-wire fashion over the Chad Brown-trained Gronkowski to become just the 13th horse in history to sweep the Triple Crown.

The list of barriers that have gone down since Justify first announced himself at Santa Anita Park are as notable as the colt’s unprecedented ascension into racing’s annals. When he captured the May 5 Kentucky Derby Presented by Woodford Reserve (G1), he became the first horse since Apollo in 1882 to take the 10-furlong test without having raced as a 2-year-old. When he turned back Eclipse Award winner Good Magic in the Preakness Stakes (G1) and then held off late-running Bravazo to prevail by half a length, he gave his Hall of Fame conditioner what was then a record-tying 14th victory in a Triple Crown race and put himself in position to join Seattle Slew (1977) as the only undefeated horses to take all three classics.

In equaling Slew’s feat with a sublime triumph Saturday that never saw him get seriously tested, Justify not only gave Baffert his record-breaking 15th Triple Crown race win, he put the white-haired savant alongside the great “Sunny Jim” Fitzsimmons as the only trainers to condition two Triple Crown heroes, with Baffert also having guided American Pharoah , who famously ended the 37-year drought between feats in 2015.

Justify also provided his 52-year-old legendary jockey Mike Smith—pilot of such Hall of Famers as Zenyatta, Holy Bull, and Inside Information—the one accomplishment that was missing from his résumé.

“I’ve been through it and … if he was great, he was going to do it. And that’s what it’s about,” an emotional Baffert said of Justify. “To me, I wanted to see that horse, his name up there with the greats. If they’re great, they’re going to win the Triple Crown. It takes a great horse to win the Triple Crown.

“I don’t have to really compare (Justify and American Pharoah) because if they make it on that wall (of Triple Crown winners), that’s all you need to say.”

That Baffert has been dropping Justify’s name in the same breath as American Pharoah’s since his 2 1/2-length victory over juvenile champion Good Magic in the Kentucky Derby was a shot across the bow of what would be coming down the pike heading into Belmont Park‘ssignature 1 1/2-mile test.

Where American Pharoah proved the game hadn’t passed the current-day Thoroughbred by in terms of being able to thrive during the Triple Crown grind, Justify illustrated that superior talent can get a late start and still run every obstacle into the ground. In his first career outing, Justify set testing fractions of :21.80 and :44.37 and still drew off to win by 9 1/2 lengths going seven furlongs. That display of speed and stamina proved to be just the tip of the iceberg of what he was about to become.

Following an equally handy 6 1/2-length, optional-claiming allowance win March 11, Justify was in a progress-or-bust situation where his Kentucky Derby prospects were concerned. He needed a top-two finish in the April 7 Santa Anita Derby (G1) to ensure himself a shot to make history beneath the Twin Spires. As has become his trademark, he took it to the more seasoned members of his class—besting multiple grade 1 winner Bolt d’Oro by three lengths—in an effort Baffert didn’t even think was emblematic of the colt’s upside.

“When we came with this horse, when he won his second out, I was thinking, ‘I think this is a Derby horse. He could be a Triple Crown horse, man,'” Baffert said. “He just showed us that raw talent was there. He’s like a walk-on. He just came on there and he broke every curse there was. It was just meant to be.”

After chasing a hot pace in the Kentucky Derby and after Good Magic tried to put the heat on him in the Preakness, the only vulnerability anyone could come up with when forecasting a dismal Belmont scenario for Justify was if the strain of packing five races into just over 90 days hit him between the ears when he had to stretch himself for 12 furlongs over a track whose surface can sap form from even the fittest of runners.

Even before the field of 10 was drawn, that notion took a hit when the colt campaigned by WinStar Farm, China Horse Club, Starlight Racing, and Head of Plains Partners threw down a pair of impressive works at Churchill Downs—most notably a four-furlong sizzler in :46 4/5 May 29 that had a look of a horse going through a routine gallop.

When he leaped out of post 1 Saturday and began his devastating rhythm before he even reached the first turn, the gauntlet was effectively thrown down.

“I knew if I jumped out well, he’s just faster than they are,” Smith said. “He was about a neck to a head in front the first couple of jumps, so I was really happy with the way he got away from there.

“Some horses just stay on, or some just completely stay off. But he just listens to everything I say. Every time I want him to just take a breather, I just put my hands back down and he’d settle right back down. And if I wanted to squeeze him a little, he’ll jump right back again.”

Smith is savvy enough to know not to get in the way of a great horse doing his thing. Making his life even easier was the fact none of Justify’s nine rivals bothered to press his tactical speed.

With his stablemate Restoring Hope going wide around the first turn and moving into second position, and Bravazo settling in third, Justify ran the opening quarter in an honest :23.37 but was allowed to back things off a bit through a half-mile in :48.11. As Smith and his partner reached the final turn after clocking a mile in 1:38.09, the Todd Pletcher-trained Vino Rosso loomed to his outside just a half-length behind.

Where that challenger and the rest of his brethren were coming under a ride, however, Smith was still sitting in statue mode, yet to call upon all the gas in the tank.

“I just wanted to wait as long as I could before I really put the pedal to the metal,” Smith said. “He dug back in, and I felt at that point he would hold off anybody that was coming.”

“Down the backside, I figured it would be nearly impossible for (Justify) to get beat by anyone when I saw 1:13 and change (for three quarters),” Brown added. “I changed my mind a little at the quarter pole when I saw Gronkowski saved every bit of ground because … (jockey) Jose Ortiz gave me a million-dollar ride today.”

As Justify hit the top of the lane with history within his grasp, Gronkowksi—who was last in the early going, several lengths behind the field after breaking slowly from post 6—indeed tried to do what his stablemate Good Magic had done before him and inject some drama into the outcome. The son of Lonhro whipped up the inside rail in his first Stateside start and first try on dirt and came with a rally that in most years would have been good enough to make him a stunner of a classic hero.

This was no ordinary season, however. And Justify reaffirmed in the stretch he was no ordinary athlete. As the crowd provided an emphatic soundtrack befitting the achievement before them, the big red specimen dug in gamely to hit the wire in 2:28.18 over a fast track, with Gronkowski besting the Bill Mott-trained Hofburg by 1 3/4 lengths for place honors.

“It was no fault of Jose that the horse didn’t break well,” Brown said of Gronkowski. “From there, he got everything out of this horse. He did a great job for me. (Baffert) did a training job that is one of the greatest of all time. The pace might have been a little slow, but this horse (Justify) ran in three Triple Crown races, and he showed up and earned it.”

“You can’t doubt Justify now,” Mott added. “There’s no way. You’ve got to give him credit.”

Vino Rosso faded to fourth, with Tenfold rounding out the top five. Bravazo, Free Drop Billy, Restoring Hope, Blended Citizen, and Noble Indy completed the order of finish.

With his record a spotless 6-for-6 and his place among the best of the best secure, it is a wonder what the colt bred in Kentucky by John D. Gunther could do next to add to his level of acclaim. A summer campaign was mentioned in the aftermath of his trek into the history books.

The most pressing thing all involved wanted to focus on, however, was giving themselves the proper time to soak in the achievements of the horse who took on a most improbable task in the most improbable of fashions and made it all look normal.

“To have the opportunity to be here and to make history like this is an incredible feeling,” said Elliott Walden, president of WinStar Farm. “These horses just … you buy them or whatever, but a horse like this just kind of happens. You can’t find these horses. They find you.”

https://vplayer.nbcsports.com/p/BxmELC/nbcsports_embed/select/media/xTr_cAHnUJEc

Body and Soul: The Ten Commandments of Stallion Selection

By Robert D. Fierro

We know what you’re thinking: Whatever in the world would possess someone to talk about stallion selection just before the breeding season officially ends? While some might accuse your correspondent of being somewhat possessed, in some ways, there is a logical reason for exploring this subject at this time: Everybody starts thinking about next year when the breeding shed doors close up for the season.

Stallion managers start looking more closely at prospects for the next season. Sometimes they look to stay on a roll of success after breeders stormed the doors for a newbie or freshmen sires burst out in style. Sometimes they need to assuage the frustration of a newbie failing to attract much interest, or those with a couple of crops failing to show much competence or class.

Breeders conjure up similar thoughts, especially those who booked to stallions whose first or second crops sold like hotcakes at the yearling or 2-year-old sales, but have demonstrably proven their shortcomings a week or so after their mare has been bred to one of them.

Guilt trips travel over various routes.

Below we present a check list of factors that might raise an eyebrow or two as to what we have referred to as the “Ten Commandments of Stallion Selection” (no apostacy intended, and we even phrased most of them as questions rather than dictates). While it is more geared toward the breeder than the stallion manager, there might be a nugget or two for all to find interesting, if not helpful.

[I] How Did He Run? The best sire prospects–even among sprinters–gain early position and have the cruising power, stride length, and thrust (kick from behind through hocks and quarters), to outlast the rest at the end. These horses are more efficient. On the other hand, deep closers–including closing sprinters–may be less efficient due to biomechanical issues which force them to settle, get into rhythm, and then win on momentum. It’s an axiom of genetic probability that the more efficient body will have the best chance of replicating itself in a population of mares where the majority are closer to being reasonably efficient.

[II] How did he move? Did he move as to give an appearance of running with his nose to the ground–like Danzig, Deputy Minister, A.P. Indy, for example? Did he run with his neck extended straight ahead and move in a rhythmic motion with his shoulder extension–like Affirmed and Alydar? Did he run with his head up, floating along like a ballet dancer–such as Montjeu? Which style defined your mare, and do you want to match it or blend it with another style?

[III] Where, and on what surface, did he run? The majority of leading sires in Kentucky–and in most major breeding states–raced successfully in New York, and by extension on the major circuit which includes Churchill Downs, Keeneland, Gulfstream, Santa Anita and Del Mar. Some may have done well overseas before racing here, but for the most part you want domesticity in a race record.

[IV] Is he a square, a rectangle, or a trapezoid? This is an assessment of body set and takes some eye adjustment. A square body will include equal front and rear leg length and relatively short body length–you see a square. Rectangle would include those with legs that might be the same length as those on a square body, but the length of the back and body would be long, so you see a rectangle. A trapezoid would be a body set that is to the eye either square or rectangular, but the body itself is lower or higher at the elbow or flank thereby generating either a downhill or an uphill trajectory.

[V] Is he Derek Jeter, Wilson Kipsang, or Tom Brady? Now, move around to the front and, still keeping your eyes above the knees, try to get a handle on this guy’s girth–i.e. how wide or how narrow he is. Jeter is agile and versatile, Kipsang is lanky and long-winded, Brady is as balanced as Jeter but not as agile. Think of the athlete you are viewing and determine what kind of athlete you are looking to breed.

[VI] Is he a “sport?” Biologically speaking, a “sport” is “an organism that has characteristics resulting from chromosomal alteration–a living thing that has (or can develop) the ability to act or function independently.” In the vernacular, that refers to a person or animal who appears to be completely different than what was expected, but manages to establish itself as a success. In racing, that could mean success on the racetrack, and either success or failure at stud. California Chrome is a bit of a sport.

[VII] Kick the tires. It is much easier to breed for one trait than two, and heaven forbid a stallion has bad front wheels as well as being very short in those legs. You might want to send a long legged, correct, mare to him, but you might not get a correction for both factors unless the rest of their physical traits are close. Try to do your genetic homework here–find out if bad front wheels are a trait of the sire’s pedigree, or whether the wheels were an environmental accident, e.g., awkward position in-utero, nutrition as a foal, etc.

[VIII] Who’s his daddy? Line or branch founders are generally consistent in siring the type of individual who helps establish that offshoot. Fappiano’s branch of Mr. Prospector’s line is far different than Gone West’s, Smart Strike’s and Forty Niner’s in many key aspects–each branch is quite consistent in expressing the founder’s size, aptitude, or personality, for example

[IX] What stock did his momma come from-and who was her daddy? You can quickly eliminate a stallion from consideration on the strength of the broodmare sire and his sire-line. Check the list of leading sires over the past 10 years and note which were produced by mares whose sires and maternal grandsires made no lasting impression on the breed–love that phrase, memorize it. Look at the six-cross pedigree of the stallion prospect and ask yourself, “Does this work?”

[X] Be wary of a stallion prospect whose name you cannot pronounce or spell. Years ago a breeder asked whether we thought of a new stallion, whose name he pronounced “Abajoenee.” Puzzled, we asked other pertinent questions but finally asked how the name was spelled. He spelled it and we then informed him that the name was pronounced “A-bag-in-one” (he was by Devil’s Bag). The man preferred his pronunciation and eschewed breeding to that horse.

Abaginone notwithstanding, such is the way of the world, and our game.

Bob Fierro is a partner with Jay Kilgore and Frank Mitchell in DataTrack International, biomechanical consultants and developers of BreezeFigs. He can be reached at bbfq@earthlink.net.

DHS Authorizes Additional 15,000 H-2B VIsas for FY2018

Considerations for filing an H-2B petition per the new regulation.

 

Following several weeks of tense discussions between Congress and the Trump administration, the Department of Homeland Security published a final rule May 31 in the Federal Register authorizing issuance of 15,000 additional H-2B visas for the remainder of fiscal year 2018.

As reported this spring, Congress authorized the DHS to raise its cap on H-2B temporary worker visas from the current cap of 66,000 to 129,500 visas for FY2018 within the context of the omnibus appropriations law passed in late March. DHS states that by issuing 15,000 extra H-2B visas—significantly below the additional 63,500 authorized by the FY2018 omnibus—the agency will prioritize employers who demonstrate that they would suffer “irreparable harm” to their business unless they are able to hire additional seasonal workers during the summer and fall 2018 seasons. DHS further states that it seeks to avoid possible abuse of the H-2B program by limiting the pool of extra visas to 15,000.

According to the rule, DHS punted the broader temporary worker shortage issue to Congress, urging lawmakers to reform the Immigration and Nationality Act, which establishes the H-2B visa program. During the course of the extended back-and-forth discussions between the legislative and executive branches this spring, DHS claims that only congressional action can provide long-term certainty with respect to the issuance of more guest worker visas. According to federal regulators, addressing worker shortages through the annual appropriations process fails to create certainty, undercutting the ability of the business community to plan long-term.

Since moving forward with a limited cap increase, DHS’s United States Citizenship and Immigration Service has outlined some practical considerations for filing an H-2B petition per the new regulation:

  • An employer “must meet all existing H-2B eligibility requirements,” which includes receipt of “an approved Temporary Labor Certification from the Department of Labor that is valid for the entire employment period stated on the petition.” DHS reminds employers that “the employment start date on the petition must match the employment start date on the TLC, even if that date has passed.”
  • Employers must also “conduct a fresh round of recruitment for U.S. workers if the TLC contains a start date of work before April 15, 2018.”
  • A business must “submit an attestation on Form ETA 9142-B-CAA-2 in which the petitioner affirms, under penalty of perjury, its business will likely suffer irreparable harm if it cannot hire all the requested H-2B workers before the end of the fiscal year.” The agency provides Form ETA 9142-B-CAA-2 Instructions to properly complete the attestation.
  • DHS further states that it “will not accept” an “expired ETA 9142-B-CAA from fiscal year 2017.”  The agency will reject any “petition that does not include the new ETA 9142-B-CAA-2 attestation form for fiscal year 2018.”

Recognizing the time constraints associated with the application process, DHS states that it will “adjudicate” applications within 15 calendar days for employers opting for “premium processing,” and 30 days for standard applications. To learn more about how to fast-track an H-2B visa application, please go to: https://www.uscis.gov/forms/how-do-i-use-premium-processing-service.

The unprecedented demand for guest worker visas this year will create a narrow time frame in which to submit an application.

As details unfold related to practical considerations associated with the new rule, American Horse Council will continue to inform members about developments and helpful notes for members who are considering moving forward with summer applications.

As a reminder, AHC will be conducting a panel discussion featuring congressional and industry experts June 12 in Washington as part of the association’s annual meeting. To view a copy of the final rule, go to: https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2018-05-31/pdf/2018-11732.pdf.

BUSY SUMMER UNDERWAY FOR HARRAH’S LOUISIANA DOWNS JOCKEY RICHARD ERAMIA

Bossier City, LA – Jockey Richard Eramia has spent as much time on the road as he has in the saddle, but you will never hear him complain about his schedule.  He began the year at Oaklawn Park, where he finished a respectable 12th in one of most competitive jockey colonies in the country.

 

Currently he is dividing his time between Louisiana Downs and Lone Star Park, which runs through July 15. He is solidly on top of their standings with 52 trips to the winner’s circle since their season began on April 19.  He was honored as the Jockeys’ Guild Foundation Detox Jockey of the Week for April 23 – 20, 2018 by virtue of his huge week in which he won five races on the Lone Star card and topped all other North American jockeys in wins for the week.

 

This was the second time he was recipient of that award. Last June, he was recognized when he won five of the seven races on the June 21st card Louisiana Downs. Between Louisiana Downs and Lone Star Park, he posted the most victories of any jockey in the country.

 

For the next five weeks, Eramia will be dividing his time between Lone Star Park in Grand Prairie, Texas and Louisiana Downs.

 

“I like both track surfaces here,” said Eramia. “It’s a very good turf course, but the main track is excellent as well.”

 

He finished third behind Gerardo Mora and Aubrie Green in the standings here last year, departing six weeks early to return to Remington Park.

 

He won his 2,000th career last November at Remington Park, guiding Conquest Hiosilver to victory for trainer Kenneth Nolen. He won 73 races to finish second to Ramon Vazquez.

 

“Last year was my fourth full meet at Remington,” said Eramia. “It has been great.”

 

Born in Uruguay, Eramia began his United States riding career in 2005. He has surpassed the $4 million earnings mark six times with 2,106 wins to date.  In excellent health, he has no time table for how long he will continue to ride and handles the wins and his losses with a quiet calm.

“It’s not my way to get overly excited about the wins or really down when I lose a race,” he said. “I prefer to stay steady and to take each day as it comes.”

 

Currently second to leading rider Joel Dominguez at Louisiana Downs, the hard-working veteran is highly respected in the jocks room. His fellow riders often compliment Eramia on his professionalism and willingness to serve as a mentor.

 

“That means a great deal to me,” he stated. “I was taught from an early age to show respect to others. I’ve always believed in treating people like you want to be treated.”

 

Eramia turns 39 on June 24. Chances are that he will be riding that afternoon at Lone Star Park and the birthday celebration will have to wait. That should be no problem for the easy-going family man, who makes his home four miles from Lone Star Park in Dallas.

 

However, he is looking forward to Saturday’s Belmont Stakes and will be rooting for Justify to win the Triple Crown.

 

“It is exciting to see a horse go for it,” he stated. “To get more attention for racing is great. It’s the way we make our living, and everyone wants to see another Triple Crown winner!”

 

 

Glory Be True Lights Up the Toteboard Monday Afternoon

The biggest win payout of the 2018 Louisiana Downs Thoroughbred meet came on Monday, June 4 when Glory Be True won the sixth race at odds of 72-1 and returned $146.60 for the $2.00 win bet. Owned by James Evans of Doyline, Louisiana, and trained by Beverly Burress, the 7-year-old mare by EZ Glory was making her 29th career start in a six furlong sprint for accredited Louisiana-bred fillies and mares. Breaking from post position seven under jockey Hector Del-Cid, the dark bay mare took the lead at the top of the stretch and held off a late bid from Gina’s Pie for her maiden-breaking victory.

 

“She had been off since last February,” explained Burress. “After her loss at Delta as a 6-year-old maiden, there were no other options, so we just turned her out. This year, Louisiana Downs changed their rule on maidens, so the owner wanted to give her another chance.”

 

Burress worked her in the mornings and explained that she struggled with the mare in her training efforts. Another exercise rider suggested taking off her blinkers, which made a huge difference.

 

“We clashed on the racetrack, but I always loved on her in the barn,” added Burress. “Hector knows her well; he had run second and third on her before. Now, she is no longer a maiden!”

 

It was the fourth win from 29 starters for Burress, the former jockey, who has just been training since 2016.

 

“She’ll run again,” said Burress said of Glory Be True. “James knew she would win and just told me to figure it out!”

 

Longshot players were rewarded handsomely on Monday with Mr Lexis ($64.60) winning the sixth race; Glory Be True ($146.60) captured the seventh and Bear Down Baby ($48.40) closing out the late Pick 3 for a 50-cent payout of $7,634.55.

 

Belmont Stakes Simulcast on June 9

Harrah’s Louisiana Downs invites fans of all ages to enjoy live racing and the simulcast of the 150thBelmont Stakes on Saturday, June 9. The undefeated Justify will be the favorite as he competes in the third leg of the Triple Crown facing rivals including Hofburg, Bravazo, Vino Rosso, Tenfold, Blended Citizen, Noble Indy, Free Drop Billy and Gronkowski. Should he win, he would become just the 13thThoroughbred in the history of the sport to win the Triple Crown.  Live Thoroughbred horse racing gets underway at 3:15 pm with the Belmont Stakes to run at 5:37 pm (Central).

 

In addition to the racing, Louisiana Downs will host a family fun kid zone featuring bounce houses, water slide, and face painting. The popular Food Trucks will return, or for fans that prefer the air conditioned comfort of the grandstand, the Harrah’s Club Buffet is open from 12pm – 6pm at $39.99 per person. Reservations are strongly encouraged and can be made by calling 800-551-7223 or 318-752-6367.

 

 

Wednesday and Saturday Race Day Promotions

Louisiana Downs offers value for racing fans each Wednesday with Dollar Day. They will be able to enjoy $1 hot dogs, $1 beer at the Paddock as well as $1 programs. Saturday’s weekly promotion is the Family Four Pack featuring four hot dogs, four sodas, a program, and a box seat for four at the affordable price of just $16.

 

The Total Rewards program is free for horseplayers. With the swipe of their card each Saturday, members will receive valuable incentives.  These include:

  • Play $250 or more to receive a 5X multiplier
  • Play $1,000 or more to receive a 7X multiplier
  • Play $5,000 or more to receive a 10X multiplier

Participant’s multiplier cannot exceed a total balance of more than one hundred thousand (100,000) Reward Credits during one promotional day after the multiplier is applied.

About Harrah’s Louisiana Downs

Located near Shreveport in Bossier City, Louisiana, Louisiana Downs opened in 1974 and was purchased by Caesars Entertainment in December, 2002. With annual Thoroughbred and Quarter Horse racing seasons, the track is committed to presenting the highest quality racing programs paired with its 150,000 square foot entertainment complex offering casino gambling, dining and plasma screen televisions for sports and simulcast racing.

For further information, please contact:

Trent McIntosh  |  Assistant General Manager
318-752-6980
8000 East Texas Street | Bossier City, LA 71111
www.caesars.com

June Calendar of Events

 Louisiana Thoroughbred Breeders Association would like to share the following list of dates of interest to Louisiana horsemen and women.

Brought to you by Louisiana Thoroughbred Breeders Association, Whispering Oaks Farm, and Equine Sales CompanyClick images to link to more information
June 1

  • Louisiana Futurity Nomination forms will be mailed
  • LTBA Board of Directors Ballots will be mailed

June 9

  • Belmont Day

June 11

  • LTBA Board of Directors Meeting, 1:30 p.m., Landry’s Seafood, Breaux Bridge

June 12

  • Equine Sales Company of Louisiana, Select Yearling Sale Consignment Deadline

June 13-15

  • OBS June Two-Years-Olds & Horses of Racing Age Sale, Ocala, FL

June 14

  • Flag Day

June 17

  • Fathers Day

June 22

  • Spotted Horse Stakes, Evangeline Downs
  • Acadiana Stakes, Evangeline Downs

June 23

  • Evangeline Mile, Evangeline Downs
  • Lafayette Stakes, Evangeline Downs

June 30 

  • Board of Directors Election ballots counted 
  • Louisiana Futurity payments due

Would you like to sponsor a newsletter? Reach nearly 3,000 readers.

Please contact Linda 985-386-0360, linda@louisianabred.com or Roger 504-947-4676, roger@louisianabred.com for cost and availability.

Do you have a date pertaining to Louisiana-breds that you would like included in an upcoming calendar? Please contact Linda 985-386-0360, linda@louisianabred.com or Roger 504-947-4676, roger@louisianabred.comfor consideration.

 

Any questions or need more info call

Roger A. Heitzmann III, Secretary/Treasurer

Louisiana Thoroughbred Breeders Association

504-947-4676, 800-772-1195

Minimizing Hurricane Risks

Hurricane season begins June 1 and we’ve already experienced, Alberto, the first named storm system, but it’s not too late for citizens to protect themselves and their families during severe weather.

Since the mid 1800’s, when the National Weather Service began officially recording hurricanes, 54 hurricanes have directly hit Louisiana.

It’s important for residents living in the southern states of the Gulf to take precautions.  This is particularly important for survivors still occupying both FEMA mobile homes and other mobile homes.  Below are tips to minimize your risks:

  • Never shelter in FEMA mobile housing units, or other mobile homes during tornadoes and hurricanes.
  • All FEMA mobile homes come equipped with weather radios.  It’s important to listen to them for inclement weather warnings.
  • Be sure to follow the guidance of local officials.  Severe weather may affect access to and from homes, so survivors should follow evacuation orders, and be aware of storm paths, road closures and other important information.
  • More information may be found online at fema.gov/pdf/areyouready/areyouready_full.pdf

Hurricane preparedness tips for all Louisiana residents:

Before a Hurricane

  • Document items and contents in your home in photos.
  • Place important papers and documents such as driver’s licenses, social security cards, passports, birth certificates, vehicle registration cards and insurance policies in a waterproof, portable container.
  • Consider buying flood insurance. Know your flood risk. See msc.fema.gov/portal to know the flood risk in your area and see floodsmart.gov for information about risk and rates.
  • Make a hurricane emergency plan. For tips see ready.gov/make-a-plan.
  • Build or restock your emergency preparedness kit. Important items include flashlights, battery-powered radios, batteries, cash and first aid supplies.
  • In case you need to get to higher ground, know where to go and know the best route.
  • In the event of an evacuation order, choose several temporary places to stay. These can include the homes of relatives and friends, a hotel or a shelter.
  • If you need evacuation transportation you should contact your local authorities.

Prepare Your Home

  • Bring outdoor furniture inside. Move important indoor items to the highest floor in the structure.
  • Disconnect electrical appliances. Do not touch electrical equipment if you are wet or standing in water. You could be electrocuted.
  • Before evacuation, turn off your gas and electricity at the main switch or valve. This helps prevent fires and explosions.
  • Consider elevating appliances such as water heaters and electrical equipment.

Stay Updated and Aware

  • For weather updates, emergency instructions and evacuation orders, stay tuned to your phone alerts and TV or radio. Severe weather information is also available from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration at noaa.gov.
  • Follow FEMA on Twitter at twitter.com/femaregion6 and the FEMA Blog at fema.gov/blog
  • Download the FEMA app at fema.gov/mobile-app. The app provides disaster resources, weather alerts, safety tips, maps of open shelters and weather alerts from the National Weather Service. Go to Ready.gov for more details.
  • Follow the Governor’s Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness social media at twitter.com/gohsep, facebook.com/GOHSEP and youtube.com/user/GOHSEP.
  • Download Alert FM from iTunes and Google Play. For a description go to alertfm.com.

Louisiana Bred Pickett Impresses as First Winner for Goldencents

The Louisiana-bred gelding drew clear by 6 1/2 lengths at Evangeline Downs.

Louisiana-bred Pickett was an impressive first winner May 30 for freshman sire Goldencents  at Evangeline Downs.

Making his first start for owner Charles Carlton and trainer Glenn Delahoussaye in a 4 1/2-furlong maiden special weight for accredited Louisiana-bred 2-year-olds, Pickett broke sharply under jockey Timothy Thornton and went straight to the lead with four rivals in pursuit. The dark bay or brown gelding posted fractions of :22.93 and :46.37 while increasing his advantage and steadily drew off through the lane under a moderate hand ride to win by 6 1/2 lengths.

The final time was :52.87 on a fast track.

Pickett was bred by William D. Pickett out of the unraced Dixie Brass mare Street Beat and was a $50,000 purchase by his owner from Pickett Thoroughbreds’ consignment to the 2017 Equine Sales of Louisiana yearling sale. Street Beat also produced stakes winners Ahead of Her Time (Leestown) and Hisse (Buddha).

Two-time Breeders’ Cup Dirt Mile (G1) winner Goldencents, by Into Mischief , counts the 2013 Santa Anita Derby (G1) and Sham Stakes (G3), and the 2012 Delta Downs Jackpot Stakes (G3) among his conquests. He entered stud in 2015 at Spendthrift Farm near Lexington with seven wins and seven seconds from 18 starts, with earnings of $3,044,000. He stands the 2018 season for an advertised fee of $12,500.

 

SEVERAL LOUISIANA LEGENDS STAKES WINNERS ON TARGET FOR LOUISIANA CUP DAY AT HARRAH’S LOUISIANA DOWNS

 

Bossier City, LA – Evangeline Downs hosted its richest night of the Thoroughbred season on Saturday, May 26 with eight stakes races for Louisiana-breds. Several of the Louisiana Legends Night champions are on target to compete at Harrah’s Louisiana Downs on Saturday, August 4 as part of Louisiana Cup Day.

 

Trust Factor, a 5-year-old horse owned by Scrivener Stables, captured his first career stakes last July at Louisiana Downs with a ground saving trip in the $100,000 Louisiana Legends Turf. The son of Paddy O Prado was bred in Louisiana and defeated five rivals in the mile and one-sixteenth turf stakes with jockey Colby Hernandez in the irons.   He added a turf victory at Fair Grounds in the $60,000 Dixie Ace Poker Stakes on March 3 and returned to the winner’s circle last Saturday in the $75,000 Louisiana Legends Turf at Evangeline Downs.

 

Trainer Mike Maker said Trust Factor will likely make his next start on August 4 at Louisiana Downs in the Louisiana Cup Turf Classic.

 

“It’s the most logical spot,” said Maker. “He’s a cool horse and fits well in state-bred company. He has been fortunate that each of the Louisiana turf stakes wins were on firm turf courses. That’s what he likes.”

 

Mary Rampellini of the Daily Racing Form reported that Double Star, winner of the $75,000 Equine Sales Derby is under consideration for the $60,000 Prelude, a mile and one-sixteenth main track race for 3-year-olds, which will also run on August 4. The son of Star Guitar is trained by Robert Schultz for Four Star Racing. His victory last weekend at Evangeline Downs was his fourth win in 11 starts.

 

Rampellini also spoke with conditioner Ron Faucheux about Monte Man, winner of the $75,000 Louisiana Legends Sprinton Louisiana Legends Night. Sired by Custom For Carlos, Monte Man’s victory on Saturday night was his fifth in a row. Owned by Ivery Sisters Racing, Faucheux told Rampellini that his sprinter is a candidate for the $50,000 Louisiana Cup Sprint.

 

Much more on Louisiana Cup Day which will take place on Saturday, August 4 in the weeks to come. Nominations for the seven stakes close July 21.

 

Belmont Stakes Simulcast on June 9

Harrah’s Louisiana Downs invites fans of all ages to enjoy live racing and the simulcast of the 150th Belmont Stakes on Saturday, June 9. The undefeated Justify will be the favorite as he competes in the third leg of the Triple Crown facing rivals including Hofburg, Bravazo, Vino Rosso, Tenfold, Blended Citizen, Noble Indy, Free Drop Billy and Gronkowski. Should he win, he would become just the 13th Thoroughbred in the history of the sport to win the Triple Crown.  Live Thoroughbred horse racing gets underway at 3:15 pm with the Belmont Stakes to run at 5:37 pm (Central).

 

In addition to the racing, Louisiana Downs will host a family fun kid zone featuring bounce houses, water slide, and face painting. The popular Food Trucks will return, or for fans that prefer the air conditioned comfort of the grandstand, the Harrah’s Club Buffet is open from 12pm – 6pm at $39.99 per person. Reservations are strongly encouraged and can be made by calling 800-551-7223 or 318-752-6367.

 

Trainer, Jockey and Owner Standings

As of May 30, Joe O. Duhon and Karl Broberg top the trainer standings with six wins each.  Jorge Lara, Dana Whited and Henry E. Uriegas have each saddled five winners.  Danny Pish, Al Stall, Jr. and Tyron Benoit follow closely with four wins.

 

Joel Dominguez, who lost his bug on May 24, did not lose a beat transitioning to the journeyman ranks. He added four victories to remain in the lead of the jockey standings with 14 wins. Richard Eramia is second with 13 trips to the winner’s circle and last year’s leading jockey Gerardo Mora is third with 11 wins. Kevin Smith, Hector Del-Cid and Aubrie Green have each won eight races.

 

Dream Walkin Farms, Inc has won five races to maintain the lead in the owner standings. End Zone Athletics, Inc. is next with four wins and Brittlyn Stable Inc, P and D Racing Stables and Jorge Gomez follow with three wins each.

 

Wednesday and Saturday Race Day Promotions

Louisiana Downs offers value for racing fans each Wednesday with Dollar Day. They will be able to enjoy $1 hot dogs, $1 beer at the Paddock as well as $1 programs. Saturday’s weekly promotion is the Family Four Packfeaturing four hot dogs, four sodas, a program, and a box seat for four at the affordable price of just $16.

 

The Total Rewards program is free for horseplayers. With the swipe of their card each Saturday, members will receive valuable incentives.  These include:

  • Play $250 or more to receive a 5X multiplier
  • Play $1,000 or more to receive a 7X multiplier
  • Play $5,000 or more to receive a 10X multiplier

Participant’s multiplier cannot exceed a total balance of more than one hundred thousand (100,000) Reward Credits during one promotional day after the multiplier is applied.

About Harrah’s Louisiana Downs

Located near Shreveport in Bossier City, Louisiana, Louisiana Downs opened in 1974 and was purchased by Caesars Entertainment in December, 2002. With annual Thoroughbred and Quarter Horse racing seasons, the track is committed to presenting the highest quality racing programs paired with its 150,000 square foot entertainment complex offering casino gambling, dining and plasma screen televisions for sports and simulcast racing.

For further information, please contact:

Trent McIntosh  |  Assistant General Manager
318-752-6980
8000 East Texas Street | Bossier City, LA 71111
www.caesars.com

Homeland Security Announces 15,000 Additional H-2B Visas For 2018

Saturday, Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen M. Nielsen announced that an additional 15,000 H-2B temporary nonagricultural worker visas will be available for Fiscal Year 2018. In this determination, Secretary Nielsen determined there are not sufficient, qualified, U.S. workers available to perform temporary non-agriculture labor to satisfy the needs of American businesses in FY18. This allocation is in addition to the 66,000 visas already issued this year. Secretary Nielsen made this decision after consulting with Secretary of Labor Alexander Acosta, members of Congress, and business owners.

“The limitations on H-2B visas were originally meant to protect American workers, but when we enter a situation where the program unintentionally harms American businesses it needs to be reformed,” said Secretary Nielsen. “I call on Congress to pass much needed reforms of the program and to expressly set the number of H-2B visas in statute.  We are once again in a situation where Congress has passed the buck and turned a decision over to DHS that would be better situated with Congress, who knows the needs of the program.  As Secretary, I remain committed to protecting U.S. workers and strengthening the integrity of our lawful immigration system and look forward to working with Congress to do so.”

The H-2B temporary nonagricultural worker program was designed to serve U.S. businesses unable to find a sufficient number of qualified U.S. workers to perform nonagricultural work of a temporary nature. Congress set the annual H-2B visa cap at 66,000. A maximum of 33,000 H-2B visas are available during the first half of the fiscal year, and the remainder, including any unused H-2B visas from the first half of that fiscal year, is available starting April 1 through September 30.

On February 27, 2018, USCIS determined that it had received sufficient H-2B petitions to meet the full FY 2018 statutory cap of 66,000.

In the FY 2018 Omnibus, Congress delegated its authority to the Secretary to increase the number of temporary nonagricultural worker visas available to U.S. employers through September 30, just as it did in the FY 2017 Omnibus. In the intervening time since enactment of the FY 2018 Omnibus, the Secretary consulted with the Secretary of Labor on the issue, in accordance with Congressional requirements, and developed this rule.

Starting this week, eligible petitioners for H-2B visas can file Form I-129, Petition for a Nonimmigrant Worker.  Eligible petitioners must submit a supplemental attestation on Form ETA 9142-B-CAA-2 with their petition.

Details on eligibility and filing requirements will be available in the final temporary rule and on the Increase in H-2B Nonimmigrant Visas for FY 2018 webpage to be published on uscis.gov when the final temporary rule is posted for public inspection.

DHS is committed to ensuring that our immigration system is implemented lawfully and that American workers are protected. If members of the public have information that a participating employer may be abusing this program, DHS invites them to submit information to ReportH2BAbuse@uscis.dhs.gov and include information identifying the H-2B petitioning employer and relevant information that leads them to believe that the H-2B petitioning employer is abusing the H-2B program.

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