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SEVEN STAKES TO BE CONTESTED ON LOUISIANA CUP DAY AT HARRAH’S LOUISIANA DOWNS ON SATURDAY, AUGUST 4

Field of 11 Entered in the $60,000 Super Derby Prelude with Winner Advancing

to the Grade 3,$300,000 Super Derby on Sunday, September 2

 

Bossier City, LA – The fields are set for Louisiana Cup Day at Harrah’s Louisiana Downs on Saturday, August 4.  First post is 3:15 pm (Central) for the all-stakes card which will feature six stakes for accredited Louisiana-breds as well as the $60,000 Super Derby Prelude.

The Prelude for 3-year-olds will be contested at the distance of a mile and one-sixteenth on the main track. The winner will receive a berth to the Grade 3, $300,000 Super Derby on Sunday, September 2, which is the richest race of the 2018 Louisiana Downs Thoroughbred racing season.

Leading the 11-horse field for the Prelude is Dream Baby Dream, a colt by Into Mischief out of the Songandaprayer mare Galetoire. He will make his 12th career start for Dream Baby Dream Racing Stable and Hall of Fame conditioner Steve Asmussen. Winless this year, he ran second in the Sunland Derby in March, then the Grade 1, Arkansas Derby and most recently, the Ohio Derby. A recent solid work at Ellis Park was encouraging for Asmussen, and the bay colt will break from post position four with Diego Saenz as the 5-2 morning-line favorite.

“He ran a great race at Sunland, but was a little overmatched in the (graded) stakes,” said Asmussen from his Saratoga base. “I hope he will turn things around on Saturday. Lee Ackerley (Dream Baby Dream Racing Stable) was one of my first owners and we continue to have a great association.”

Current Louisiana Downs leading trainer Al Stall, Jr. sends the undefeated Autumn Warrior to the stakes. Owned and bred by Robert Guidry’s Autumn Hill Farms Racing Stables Inc., the son of Orb out of the Posse mare, Kinsolving broke his maiden here on May 5 by 14 lengths and advanced directly into stakes company. He captured the $50,000 Lafayette Stakes for Louisiana-bred 3-year-olds at Evangeline Downs by an impressive margin of 6-3/4 lengths.  This will be the first start around two turns, but Stall, who has won 15 races so far this meet at Louisiana Downs, feels his charge is ready.
“If you look at his races, he was just galloping,” he said. “Stretching out to two-turns is the challenge; his sire, Orb, won the Kentucky Derby, but his dam, Posse, was a sprinter. You never know, but we like what we have seen from him so far.”

Colby Hernandez has the return call on Autumn Warrior, installed as the second choice at 3-1. Stall acknowledges two special people in his corner, owner Robert Guidry and longtime assistant, Pam Fitzgerald, who capably oversees his Louisiana Downs string.

“Mr. Guidry gave me my first horse back in 1991, a filly by Mt. Livermore named Lady Cacharel,” said Stall. “Pam has been an invaluable part of our team for more years than I can count. She handles the lion’s share of  our horses in Shreveport and it has been a very good meet for us.”

Rosemont Farm’s homebred Zanesville returns to Louisiana for trainer Tom Amoss. The son of Tiznow began his career in Kentucky, breaking his maiden earlier this year at Delta Downs. He shipped to Prairie Meadows and closed well for third in the $65,000 Prairie Mile on June 8.

 “He came out of that race fine,” said Amoss. “He’s a late running type and will do well if they set a nice pace and he can come with his late run.”

Amoss, like Stall and Asmussen, will be at Saratoga on Saturday, but he knows Zanesville will be in good hands with jockey Gerard Melancon.

“I can’t say enough about Gerard,” added Amoss. “We have a great relationship; he knows what I want from him and always offers me valuable insight into our horses.”

Analyze This Jet, who ran fourth in the Prairie Mile, has been nominated by trainer Terry Eoff   who co-owns the Kentucky-bred son of Overanalyze with Johnny Evans. He won the El Joven Stakes at Retama Park last October.

Trainer Robert Schultz will saddle Double Star for the $60,000 Prelude. Owned by Four Star Racing, the son of Star Guitar out of the Stormy Atlantic mare Bond Queen, has won four of his 12 career efforts, including two stakes earlier this year at Evangeline Downs.

The Super Derby Prelude is set as the sixth race of the card, with an approximate post time of 5:45 pm.  The complete field, in post position order, with riders is: Double Star, Jose Guerrero; Speedy Fellar, Richard Eramia; G’s Turn, Thomas Pompell; Dream Baby Dream, Diego Saenz: Zanesville, Gerard Melancon; In Charge Halo, Gerardo Mora; Autumn Warrior,  Colby Hernandez; McFeely, Ashley Broussard; Bode’s Maker, Joel Dominguez Analyze This Jet, Sasha Risenhoover; and Major Brown, Emanuel Nieves. 

“We are very grateful to our horsemen for their tremendous support of our all-stakes card this Saturday,” said David Heitzmann, Louisiana Downs Director of Racing. “They were encouraged by the additional $10,000 for each of the accredited Louisiana-bred stakes and we thank the  Louisiana Thoroughbred Breeders Association (LTBA) for the added money. We look forward to presenting an excellent Louisiana Cup Day.”

 

$60,000 Louisiana Cup Juvenile Fillies

The first stakes of the afternoon will feature a field of eight accredited 2-year-old Louisiana-bred fillies in the six-furlong $60,000 Louisiana Cup Juvenile Fillies.

Atchata owned by Corrine and William Heiligbrodt has been a rising star for trainer Steve Asmussen. The daughter of Apriority was bred by 4M Ranch and made her first two starts at Belmont Park before shipping to Evangeline Downs for the $75,000 D.S. “Shine” Young Futurity, winning by a margin of  6 ½ lengths. Installed at odds of 7-5, she has already won $100,000.  Diego Saenz, who guided her to victory at Evangeline Downs on July 14, will ride.

“She’s a very nice filly; very quick,” stated Asmussen. “We felt this was a very good spot for her.”

Silvercents, who ran second in $100,000 TTA Sale Futurity for Terry Eoff and Johnny Evans at Lone Star Park, will make her Louisiana Downs debut under rider Sasha Risenhoover. The daughter of Goldencents has hit the board in each of her three career starts.

The field also includes Scat At Ms. Pat’s who ran third to Atchata in the D.S. Shine Young Futurity as well as Brittlyn Stable, Inc.’s homebred Iona Guitar, by Star Guitar who broke her maiden impressively here on July 7 for Stall.

 

$60,000 Louisiana Cup Filly & Mare Sprint

The $60,000 Louisiana Turf Cup Classic attracted seven fillies and mares competing at the distance of six furlongs. 

The field includes several mares who competed in the $75,000 Louisiana Legends Mademoiselle on May 26 at Evangeline Downs, including Efforting, Dixie Brees and Frolic.  Stall conditions Efforting, a 4-year-old daughter of Into Mischief for Horseplayers Racing Club, LLC.

“She runs really well fresh,” said Stall. “We liked her work last weekend; was one of the best works by any of our horses. This is the right spot for her.”

Efforting will break from the rain under Colby Hernandez as the 5-2 choice.

Recent allowance winners Honest Victory for owner/trainer Tim Dixon and I’ll Take it All, trained by Ralph Irwin, will make their first foray into stakes company.

 

$60,000 Louisiana Cup Distaff

An overflow field of 13 accredited Louisiana-bred fillies and mares will take to the Franks Turf Course for the $60,000 Louisiana Cup Distaff.

Bermuda Star, owned by Brittlyn Stable, Inc., will likely be one of the top contenders in the mile and one-sixteenth feature.  Bred by Tom Curtis and Wayne Simpson, the daughter of Star Guitar is trained by Victor Arceneaux, and will be seeking her fifth career win on Saturday. The gray filly won the 2017 Equine Sales Oaks at Evangeline Downs, and exits a fifth place finish in the Opelousas Stakes on July 6. She will reunite with Diego Saenz at odds of 5-1.

“She ran well last year at Louisiana Downs,” said Arceneaux of her runner-up effort in the Elge Rasberrry Stakes. “We look for a good race from her Saturday.”

Another Brittlyn Stable, Inc. filly,  Wild About Star is entered for Stall, and will be ridden by Colby Hernandez. Successful in turf sprints, she will stretch out to two turns in the Distaff.

Eskenformore, trained by James Hodges, has a proven turf record at Louisiana Downs. Owned by Sugarland Thoroughbreds LLC, the 5-year-old mare will be ridden by Richard Eramia.

Stakes-placed Pera for trainer Ricky Courville and Smiley Briley from the barn of Al Cates also have performed well in their turf races.

 

 

$60,000 Louisiana Cup Juvenile

The fourth feature of the afternoon is the $60,000 Louisiana Cup Juvenile for Louisiana-bred 2-year-old colts and geldings.  A field of eight will compete at six furlongs on the main track.

Norman Stables LLC’s Victory Trip ran second in the D.S. Shine Futurity for trainer Lonnie Briley and will break from the far outside post  as the 5-2 favorite under Ashley Broussard.

“He ran really green in that race,” stated Briley. “He ducked out and lost several lengths, but he came out of the race with no problems and has been working well. I think he’ll move forward; the good news is that he is sound, and kind of a neat, little horse.”

Asmussen and the Heiligbrodt’s team up with Beto, who finished third to Victory Trip.

Trainer Danny Pish won last year’s edition of the race with Scott Brown’s Aceguitar and will saddle Liaison Halo, who broke his maiden here on July 8 for owner Dennis E. Foster.

 

$60,000 Louisiana Cup Turf Classic

The $60,000 Louisiana Turf Cup Classic attracted 11 turf runners going a mile and one-sixteenth over the Franks Turf Course.

Mageez, a 5-year-old sired by Musket Man has been installed as the 3-1 morning line favorite. Owned by Double Dam Farm LLC and trained by Delmar Caldwell, Mageez has hit the board in each of his last three stakes races, running a game second to Mobile Bay in the Star Guitar at Fair Grounds. He broke his maiden at Louisiana Downs three years ago.

Trainer H. B. Johnson has two entrants, including Berniestrike, who pulled the upset in last year’s event.  Bred and owned by James Boyd,  the son of Wilburn out of the Unusual Heat mare Unusual Strike won at odds of 22-1.  He won off an eight-month layoff last year and will be making his first stakes in six months, as his last race was the Dixie Poker Aceon March 3 at Fair Grounds.

“He ran in New Orleans and got hurt, so we had to give him some time off,” said Johnson. “I think he’ll do well again; turf is his best surface.”

The 5-year-old gelding has won four of his 19 starts, earning $169,470 to date. Johnson will also saddle Lass Channel, a 7-year-old sired by English Channel who rallied for a turf win here on June 2. Joel Dominguez will ride Lass Channel andEmanuel Nieves has the call on the defending champion, Berniestrike.

Theoryintopractice, captured the $50,000 Starter on  Louisiana Legends Night at Evangeline Downs, will run for owner Courtney Barousse and trainer Corale Richards. The son of Into Mischief is undefeated on turf and makes his first start at Louisiana Downs.

Other notables include Magic Vow, who ran third in last year’s Prelude Stakes for Brittlyn Stable, Inc. and stakes-placed turf runners Paddy O’ Lionel and In The Navy.

 

$60,000 Louisiana Cup Sprint

The $60,000 Louisiana Cup Sprint will close out the card run as race seven. The six-furlong main track dash drew a field of 11.  

Monte Man, owned by Ivery Sisters Racing, will be seeking his sixth consecutive win for trainer Ron Faucheux. His most recent victory came on May 26 at Evangeline Downs when jockey Gerard Melancon guided him to the wire of the $75,000 Louisiana Legends Sprint. It was the third consecutive stakes score for the son of  Custom For Carlos, out of the Sutter’s Prospect mare, Sarah’s My Angel, bred by Val C. Murell. 

“We have just had him since October and he’s undefeated so far,” said Faucheux.

Melancon has the return call and will break from post position seven as the 2-1 choice.

Divine Bean, who was gelded after the Fair Grounds meet and has come back “as a different horse” according to trainer Al Stall. He’s won his last two races for Brittlyn Stable Inc.

Another contender is Sir Genghis, a 7-year-old sired by Tale of the Cat, who will make his 46th career starts on Saturday. Trained by Kirk Harris, the dark bay gelding ran second to Monte Man in the Louisiana Legends Sprint and is the high earner in the field with $449,412.

 

Several Jockeys Making Their First Appearance of the Meet

In addition to the leading riders of the Louisiana Downs meet, there will be some new jockeys making the trip to Bossier City for Saturday’s card. Gerard Melancon, Ashley Broussard, Diego Saenz,  Kerwin Clark and Sasha Risenhoover all have mounts on Louisiana Cup Day.

 

Handicapping Preview Show Set for Saturday Afternoon

Louisiana Downs track announcer John McGary and regional racing publicist Martha Claussen will team up for a pre-race handicapping preview at 2:30 pm in the Inside Rail, located on the first floor of the grandstand. They will offer analysis and their selections for each of the races on the Louisiana Cup Day card.

 

Scholarship Drawings Set for Louisiana Cup Day

The Louisiana Thoroughbred Breeders Association will award two (2) scholarships, each valued at $1,000 on Louisiana Cup Day.

The drawings will be between the fifth and sixth races. The races begin at 3:15 p.m. and the student must be there to register between 2:15 p.m. and 3:15 p.m.at the designated registration booth.

The requirements for the scholarship are as follows:

Must be a college student enrolled full-time for Fall 2018.

Must be in good standing with the college or university.

Must be present at the drawing location to win.

Must have university ID number or Social Security number.

The scholarship will be deposited directly into the student’s account at the college or university. The student is asked to know the name and address of the college that they are attending.

 

For more information on requirements for the scholarships, please call 1-800-772-1195 or visit louisianabred.com.

 

About Harrah’s Louisiana Downs

Located near Shreveport in Bossier City, Louisiana, Louisiana Downs opened in 1974 and was purchased by Caesars Entertainment in December, 2002. With annual Thoroughbred and Quarter Horse racing seasons, the track is committed to presenting the highest quality racing programs paired with its 150,000 square foot entertainment complex offering casino gambling, dining and plasma screen televisions for sports and simulcast racing.

 

Hay! Are You Getting What You Pay For?

Today’s high forage prices are an extra incentive to understand hay quality.

 

by Stephanie Davis DVM 

 

July 31, 2018 – In most instances, I would argue that the idiom, “You get what you pay for,” is almost always true. Especially as U.S. hay prices have escalated significantly, it would be great if that were true. However, when it comes to buying hay, it’s not that simple.

Just because the hay is expensive, looks or feels good, or is a “heavy bale,” does not automatically mean it’s of high quality. Although hay is most typically sold by weight, much of that weight could be due to a high percentage of ash in the hay.

Ash is the total mineral content divided into two types: internal ash (from the plant) and external ash (dirt and dust from harvesting and storage). So, you could literally be paying more for a bale that essentially has more dirt than another one. A ranch manager in Central California recently paid $345 a ton for the “high quality” alfalfa she requires for a band of senior equine citizens, up from $190 a ton 10 years ago. Fuel prices involved in that hike make it an extreme example, but, at any price, you don’t want much of it going toward external ash.

Therefore, weight is not a good way to determine if the hay is of high quality. It’s important to know if the hay is actually of high quality as well as what factors can affect the quality and nutritional value.
The main factors affecting hay quality include: the type of hay, soil, weed contamination, rain (moisture), and how the hay is cut, dried, and baled. As the buyer for our horses, we cannot control any of these factors. Even if we have a great relationship with our hay supplier, they can only control so much themselves depending upon the weather and the type of equipment they use to bale the hay.

The only definitive way to know the quality of your hay is to have it tested. There are feed companies that will test your hay for you at a very reasonable cost. Additionally, some of the best hay providers will have the hay tested before they sell it to you. The more often you test your hay, you will be surprised by the differences in the nutritional profiles.

In a perfect world, your hay has been tested and shows an excellent nutritional profile with a low ash percentage and has a high leaf-to-stem ratio. If this is the profile of your hay, then why would the hay need to be steamed? There are two simple reasons: mold spores and external ash. Mold spore count can also be tested by a laboratory. They are measured in “colony forming units per gram” (cfu/g). If hay has over 1 million cfu/g, you have a high risk of causing respiratory problems with your horse. Even though the hay has a high nutritional profile, it could still have a high mold spore count.

Unfortunately, as the grass itself grows, there are a number of bacteria and fungi that will grow on the plant naturally. As the hay is cut and dried, certain types of bacteria and fungi will die off but others may thrive in a lower moisture environment. That is why the drying stage of making hay is so very important. However, even if the processing of the hay goes exactly to plan, a certain number of mold spores remain and will inevitably invade your horse’s airway. Second, is the issue of the external ash. Even with a low percent, there will still be an amount of dust and particulate matter that will remain on the hay and become airborne once the horse pulls on the hay to break it apart to eat.

Therefore, regardless of the quality of the hay, all hay will have mold spores, dust, and particulate matter that can insult the horse’s airway. The best way to combat those problems is to steam the hay from the inside-out using a high temperature hay steamer. This is scientifically proven to kill mold spores and reduce the dust and particulate matter.

 

Article provided by Haygain as part of our Horse Health Library, and photos are available on request. For more educational articles on a variety of conditions our products address, please contact Kim F Miller at kimfmiller1@mac.com.

 

Haygain is committed to improving equine health through scientific research, product innovation and consumer education in respiratory and digestive health issues. With offices in England and the USA, Haygain distributes products for healthier horses to 19 countries, including its Haygain® Hay Steamers, ComfortStall® Orthopedic Sealed Flooring System, ForagerTM Slow Feeder and Flexineb® Portable Equine Nebulizer. Visit www.haygain.us for more information.

House Appropriators Score Win for Horse Industry, Advance H-2B Visa Cap Relief!

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July 26, 2018

House Appropriators Score Win for Horse Industry, Advance H-2B Visa Cap Relief!

On July 25, the House Appropriations Committee convened a mark-up for the Fiscal Year (FY) 2019 Appropriations for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS).  By voice vote, the committee approved an amendment that exempts returning workers from the 66,000 statutory cap imposed on the H-2B guest worker visa program, providing much needed H-2B visa cap relief advocated by the horse industry and its allies.  The amendment, offered by Congressional Horse Caucus Members Rep. Andy Harris, MD (R-MD) and Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger (D-MD), among others, applies to workers who have received guest worker visas during the previous two years.  Additionally, the provision also establishes a visa allocation system that disburses work permits on a quarterly basis.  Lawmakers believe that the quarterly system will create more flexibility for employers whose labor demands do not align with the semi-annual allocation system, whereby DHS awards permits on April 1 and October 1.  The horse industry and its allies in the H-2B Coalition fight for a variety of flexibility measures, including a straight-forward increase in the visa cap, or generous exemptions from the statutory cap, such as those for returning workers.

Pointing to another flexibility measure, Rep. Harris (R-MD) released a statement explaining the importance of a provision that allocates visas on a “proportional” rather than a “winner take all” basis.  Under this provision, DHS would award a portion of all timely, requested visas to all applicants, even in the event that “the higher limits authorized by [the] amendment are not enough to satisfy all the needs in a given year.”  To view a copy of Rep. Harris’s statement, please click here:  https://harris.house.gov/media/press-releases/house-appropriations-committee-approves-harris-language-repairing-h-2b-visa.

While the House spending bill advances the goal of effectively raising the H-2B visa cap, the Senate version of the bill doesn’t address the H-2B visa issue, setting up an item to be negotiated during a House and Senate conference.  Although lawmakers intend to finalize their spending measures before the current FY ends on September 30, this is a deadline that Congress rarely meets.   As in years past, Congress may pass a series of “continuing resolutions” to fund the federal government.  AHC will keep you posted on developments related to the H-2B measure as the FY2019 appropriations process moves forward.  To view a copy of the three-page amendment, please click here:  http://www.horsecouncil.org/wpcontent/uploads/2018/07/HARRMD_037_xml-offered-2-1.pdf.

If you’d like more information related to the guest worker issue, including ongoing grassroots outreach from the horse industry, please contact Bryan Brendle at bbrendle@horsecouncil.org or 202-296-4031.

View Article on AHC Website

Illinois Racing Board Moves Ahead on Historical Racing

Board accepted report that defines historical horse racing as pari-mutuel.

The Illinois Racing Board agreed at its July 26 meeting to move forward with planning for implementation of wagering on historical horse racing terminals through the state’s three remaining racetracks.

Without objection, the full board accepted a report from a committee headed by commissioner Thomas McCauley that found historical horse racing is pari-mutuel wagering, as defined under Illinois law, and could be implemented without legislative action.

By accepting the report, the board also agreed that staff “be directed to draft suggested rules to be considered by the board, whereby organization licensees could lawfully and permissibly conduct historical horse racing.”

Before historical horse racing can become a reality, those rules would have to be approved by the IRB and the governor’s staff, then submitted to and approved by the legislature’s Joint Committee on Administrative Rules. A court challenge also would be likely, as anti-gambling groups steadfastly oppose any expansion.

McCauley and chairman Jeffrey Brincat emphasized historical horse racing—a slot machine-like game with pari-mutuel pools and payouts based on results of previously run races—is the industry’s second choice to legislation that would authorize full casino gaming at tracks. A gaming expansion bill was left pending in Springfield, Ill., at the end of the spring legislative session but could be revived in the post-election veto session.

“Were that to happen, the HHR committee suspects that HHR might then be dropped for the much more lucrative games, which the casinos have,” McCauley said. “But that is speculation, and we have to deal with the reality that confronts us.”

Asked whether HHR rules might be ready to roll out in November, absent legislative action on gaming expansion, Brincat said he believes the process will be “expeditious.” But he warned delays are possible in a complicated legal and political environment.

Fairmount Park in downstate Collinsville, Ill., and Hawthorne Race Course in suburban Chicago actively support the historical horse racing proposal. Arlington International Racecourse, the report noted, is neutral.

McCauley said the Illinois horse racing industry “is in a desperate economic condition. It is not hyperbolic to say that its viability is in doubt. Two of five tracks have closed in the last several years. The live dates of certain Thoroughbred race meetings have declined by 40% or more.”

The report noted that Illinois racing has not been allowed to compete with tracks that have gaming in nearby states.

“This may seem shocking at first blush,” the report said, “but for those of us who have witnessed the industry’s steady downward spiral, caused almost entirely by the state government’s refusal over the last 17 years to allow meaningful competition (with other states), that tragedy does not shock. Indeed, it undoubtedly was inevitable.”

Justify Retired Due To Ankle Filling

07.25.2018 | 2:14pm

Justify greets the media the morning after winning the Triple Crown

Justify, undefeated winner of the 2018 Triple Crown, has been retired from racing, it was announced today.

“Justify had some filling in his ankle, and he is just not responding quick enough for a fall campaign,” said trainer Bob Baffert. “We all wanted to see Justify run again, but ultimately it is my responsibility to make sure he is perfect. Without 60-90 days, I can’t be definite.”

Campaigned by WinStar Farm, China Horse Club, Head of Plains Partners LLC, and Starlight Racing, Justify dazzled at first asking on Feb. 18, winning his career debut at Santa Anita and proceeded to accomplish many historical feats en route to racing stardom. He broke the “Curse of Apollo” when he won the Kentucky Derby (G1) by 2 1/2 lengths on May 5, becoming the first horse since Apollo in 1882 to win the Derby without starting as a 2-year-old.

“He is an incredible horse and we are very disappointed he can’t run again,” said WinStar Farm’s Kenny Troutt. “All things happen for a reason, and we are blessed to have raced him to be the 13th Triple Crown winner in history.”

Justify went on to capture the Preakness Stakes (G1) at Pimlico under the foggiest conditions the race has ever seen. He was pressured every step of the way and fended off all challengers for the wire-to-wire victory.

“When he won the Preakness, I allowed myself to start dreaming about the Triple Crown,” said Troutt. “When we look back on this, we have been a part of an undefeated Triple Crown Champion, and hopefully a Horse of the Year.”

Justify went to New York in pursuit of history in the Belmont Stakes (G1). Sent to the lead by his Hall of Fame rider Mike Smith, Justify never looked back, winning the Belmont by 1 ¾ lengths, becoming the first undefeated Triple Crown winner since Seattle Slew.

“Like everyone else, I am disappointed he won’t run again, but I am thankful he came into my life,” Smith said. “There was never a time when I rode him that I felt like I was going to get beat. There was no horse who could run with him without sacrificing themselves, and there was no horse who could come get him. He truly is a gift from God.”

Justify provided racing international exposure through the Triple Crown, winning the Belmont Stakes in China Horse Club’s red and yellow colors after taking the Derby and Preakness in WinStar’s silks.

“To win the Triple Crown is an amazing accomplishment,” said China Horse Club’s Teo Ah Khing. “The history of the Triple Crown and the difficulty of winning the three legs is not something I take lightly. It has been a great ride for all of us, and I have complete confidence Bob is doing the right thing by Justify.”

Justify will return to WinStar Farm early next month. He won all six of his career starts, amassing earnings of $3,798,000. In addition to his Classic wins, Justify also won the Santa Anita Derby (G1). Bred in Kentucky by John Gunther, the son of Scat Daddy—Stage Magic, by Ghostzapper was purchased by China Horse Club and Maverick Racing for $500,000 out of the Glennwood Farm consignment at the 2016 Keeneland September sale.

“The timing is bad for another start in 2018, and therefore, we have to retire him,” said WinStar Farm’s Elliott Walden. “Like American Pharoah, we can’t take the risk of running Justify as a four-year-old. We all wanted him to finish his career in the Breeders’ Cup Classic (G1), but it was not meant to be. As has been reported, there is a possible sale to Coolmore in place, but that won’t be finalized until a later date. We are excited to share him with our fans starting the middle of August after he gets acclimated.”

The “First Look” will be offered to WinStar StableMates members on Aug. 10th and 11th and can be scheduled through https://stablemates2.winstarfarm.com/.  Complete tour schedule available at https://visithorsecountry.com/winstarfarm/.

Justify will also parade at Del Mar on Saturday, July 28, before traveling to WinStar.

“The parade at Del Mar will be a great opportunity for the fans in the San Diego area to come out and see him,” said Baffert.

The National Thoroughbred Racing Association released the following statement in response to the news: 

“Justify’s extraordinary racing career – from maiden to Triple Crown winner in less than four months – was as brilliant as any our sport has seen. We can’t wait to have his first runners hit the track in 2022.”

– Alex Waldrop, President and CEO, National Thoroughbred Racing Association

Nearly 120 Head Consigned to Texas Summer Yearling and Mixed Sale

The Texas Thoroughbred Association and Lone Star Park have announced a catalogue of 119 head for the upcoming Texas Summer Yearling and Mixed Sale. The auction will be held August 27 at 12 noon at the Texas Thoroughbred Sales Pavilion on the grounds of Lone Star Park.
Other sale events include a pre-sale party on the night of August 26 and a seminar that morning with representatives from The Jockey Club and equineline.com explaining the new digital certificates for foal registration. The seminar will include a demonstration of the new process and a question and answer session, so the TTA encourages all horsemen to attend in order to better understand the upcoming changes.
The catalogue includes 90 yearlings and 29 weanlings and broodmares. Many of the weanlings and broodmares are consigned by the Estate of Ed Few. The noted Texas breeder and owner passed away earlier this year.
“I think the quality of the catalogue has ticked up a notch this year,” said Tim Boyce, sales director. “We had two Texas-breds sell at this auction for $100,000 apiece last year, and that really proved that the market is still vibrant here for horses in Texas and around the region.”
For an online catalog and live video on sale day, go to www.ttasales.com.

NOMINATIONS CLOSED FOR LOUISIANA CUP DAY AT HARRAH’S LOUISIANA DOWNS

Seven Stakes to be Contested on Saturday, August 4

 Bossier City, LA – Nominations for the annual Louisiana Cup Day at Harrah’s Louisiana Downs on Saturday, August 4 have closed with solid interest from local and nationally prominent horsemen.

The Louisiana Cup Day program will feature six divisional stakes for accredited Louisiana-breds and the $60,000 Super Derby Preludefor 3-year-olds going a mile and one-sixteenth on the main track. The winner will earn a berth to the Grade 3, $300,000 Super Derby on Sunday, September 2, which is the richest race of the 2018 Louisiana Downs Thoroughbred racing season.

The Super Derby Prelude closed with 22 nominations with current Louisiana Downs leading trainer Al Stall, Jr. pointing the undefeated Autumn Warrior to the stakes. Owned and bred by Robert Guidry’s Autumn Hill Farms Racing Stables Inc., the son of Orb out of the Posse mare, Kinsolving broke his maiden here on May 5 and advanced directly into stakes company. He captured the $50,000 Lafayette Stakes for Louisiana-bred 3-year-olds at Evangeline Downs by an impressive margin of 6-3/4 lengths.  This will be the first start around two turns, but Stall, who has won 15 races so far this meet at Louisiana Downs, points to the pedigree of Autumn Warrior.

“He’s by Orb, who won the Kentucky Derby, and he’s got a big, long stride,” Stall told Mary Rampellini of the Daily Racing Form

Hall of Fame conditioner Steve Asmussen has nominated three runners to the Prelude. They include Dream Baby Dream, a colt by Into Mischief who ran seventh in the Grade 1, Arkansas Derby for Dream Baby Dream Stable. The lightly raced Full of Run is owned by Gary and Mary West and has made just four career starts, most notably in the Champagne Stakes last October at Belmont Park. Orbatron, a son Orb, ran fourth in the Ellis Park Juvenile for owner Lee Levinson and hit the board in each of his four starts at Lone Star Park.

Rosemont Farm’s homebred Zanesville has been nominated by trainer Tom Amoss. The son of Tiznow began his career in Kentucky, breaking his maiden earlier this year at Delta Downs. He shipped to Prairie Meadows and ran third in the $65,000 Prairie Mile on June 8. 

Analyze This Jet, who ran fourth in the Prairie Mile, has been nominated by trainer Terry Eoff   who co-owns the Kentucky-bred son of Overanalyze with Johnny Evans. He won the El Joven Stakes at Retama Park last October.

Trainer Robert Schultz has nominated Double Star for the $60,000 Prelude. Owned by Four Star Racing, the son of Star Guitar out of the Stormy Atlantic mare Bond Queen, has won four of his 12 career efforts, including two stakes earlier this year at Evangeline Downs.

Trainer Victor Arceneaux was on the fence regarding Testing One Two, a multiple-stakes winning filly by Star Guitar. .Bred and owned by Brittlyn Stable, Inc., she has won five of her eight career efforts and most recently ran a game third in the Iowa Oaks at Prairie Meadows.

“We have several races on the map for this filly and think very highly of her,” said Arceneaux. “I just don’t know if she’s ready to face the boys just yet.”

He indicated that Bermuda Star, a 4-year-old filly also owned by Evelyn Benoit’s Brittlyn Stable, LLC, will run in the $60,000 Louisiana Cup Distaff.

Last week, an announcement was made regarding a $10,000 purse increase for each of the Louisiana Cup Day stakes for accredited Louisiana-breds. Trainer H. B. Johnson has three runners pointed to Louisiana Cup Day, including Berniestrike, defending champion in the $60,000 Louisiana Cup Turf Classic. The veteran conditioner was pleased with the news.

“It’s a good thing,” said Johnson. “As local trainers, we appreciate that.”

The draw for the seven features on Louisiana Cup Day will take place on Saturday, July 28. The stakes are as follows:

 

$60,000 Louisiana Cup Juvenile                    2 YO LA-Bred                        Six furlongs

$60,000 Louisiana Cup Juvenile Fillies          2 YO Fillies LA-Bred             Six furlongs

$60,000 Louisiana Cup Filly & Mare Sprint  3 YO & Up F&M, LA-Bred  Six furlongs

$60,000 Louisiana Cup Sprint                        3 YO & Up LA-Bred              Six furlongs

$60,000 Louisiana Cup Turf Classic              3 YO & Up LA-Bred              1 1/16 miles (T)

$60,000 Louisiana Cup Distaff                      3 YO & Up F & M LA-Bred  1 1/16 miles (T)

$60,000 Super Derby Prelude                         3 Y0                                        1 1/16 miles

 

Scholarship Drawings Set for Louisiana Cup Day

The Louisiana Thoroughbred Breeders Association will award two (2) scholarships, each valued at $1,000, during the event.

The drawings will be between the fifth and sixth races. The races begin at 3:15 p.m. and the student must be there to register between 2:15 p.m. and 3:15 p.m.at the designated registration booth.

The requirements for the scholarship are as follows:

Must be a college student enrolled full-time for Fall 2018.

Must be in good standing with the college or university.

Must be present at the drawing location to win.

Must have university ID number or Social Security number.

The scholarship will be deposited directly into the student’s account at the college or university. The student is asked to know the name and address of the college that they are attending.

 

Super Derby Charity Golf Tournament Set for August 23

The Super Derby Charity Golf Tournament will be held on Thursday, August 23, at Querbes Golf Course in Shreveport, Louisiana.

The event will benefit Chaplain Jimmy Sistrunk & The Winner’s Circle Church, which provides assistance to the Louisiana racing community and backstretch workers. It serves as one of the special events saluting the annual Grade 3, $300,000 Super Derby, the marquee race of the Louisiana Downs Thoroughbred season, set for Sunday, September 2.

Sign in for the event’s Four Person Scramble kicks off at 10:00 a.m. with tee off at 10:30 a.m.  The fee is $80 per person or $320 for a four-person team.  The fee includes green fees, golf cart, lunch, and Super Derby t-shirt/cap.

Attendees can register in person in the Louisiana Downs Racing office, or by mail. Checks should be payable to The Backside Benevolence Fund and mailed to:  Jennifer Sokol, Harrah’s Louisiana Downs, 8000 East Texas Street, Bossier City, Louisiana, 71111. 

The deadline for registration is August 16. Hole sponsorships for $100, including a sign, are available, but must be purchased by August 1.

For further information, please contact Jennifer Sokol, Louisiana Downs Racing Office Manager at (318) 741-2512.

 

Post Times and Stakes Schedule

Live racing will be conducted Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday and Saturday with a 3:15 p.m. (Central) post time through September 27. The 84-day meet will include 14 stakes highlighted by two major events, Louisiana Cup Day on Saturday, August 4 and Super Derby Day on Sunday, September 2.  To see a complete list of the 2018 Thoroughbred stakes schedule, click here.

 

About Harrah’s Louisiana Downs

Located near Shreveport in Bossier City, Louisiana, Louisiana Downs opened in 1974 and was purchased by Caesars Entertainment in December, 2002. With annual Thoroughbred and Quarter Horse racing seasons, the track is committed to presenting the highest quality racing programs paired with its 150,000 square foot entertainment complex offering casino gambling, dining and plasma screen televisions for sports and simulcast racing.

 

EQUINE SALES COMPANY MODIFIES DATES FOR 2019 2-YEAR-OLD SALE

2019 DATE FOR 2YR OLD IN TRAINING SALE MOVED TO
APRIL 2ND!!
Equine Sales Company has announced that its 2-Year-Olds in Training Sale, traditionally held in early May, will instead be held earlier in 2019. The dates have been set for Tuesday, April 2, with the breeze show set for Sunday, March 31, in Opelousas, Louisiana.
“Our Board of Directors and Sales Committee responded to feedback received from our dedicated buyers and consignors and think this will be good fit for everyone,” said Foster Bridewell, Sales Director of Equine Sales Company. “Many 2-year-olds in this region have traditionally been prepared to race opening weekends of Evangeline Downs, Louisiana Downs and Lone Star Park. This shift in date will allow buyers and their trainers to purchase horses that will hopefully be ready to run in the early Summer races.”
Consignment information and deadlines for the 2-year-old sale will be posted in the future at www.equinesalescompany.com
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